Alexander Muneses – Independent Project

Alexander Muneses – Independent Project

Class of 2017

Introduction to Topic

Everyday approximately 76 elderly people die from falling. This adds up to 27,740 people from the age sixty-five and above die each year from falling (National council on aging, 2015). A large concentration of elderly people stay in nursing homes like the one where I completed my shadowing experience, Genesis Nursing home. As a community, if we can reduce the amount of times an elderly person falls specifically in a nursing home setting, it will make a great impact on increasing the life expectancy and living quality of the elderly people.

Project Description

My final innovation project is meant to deal with a major problem that plagues nursing homes around the country. Falls and injuries due to falls need to be a serious concern to the medical staff that work in the geriatric field. During the seventy hours that I spent shadowing Dr. Muneses as the Medical Director at the nursing home, I was able to experience firsthand the everyday issues that the nursing home has when dealing with its patients. After speaking with Dr. Muneses and the other medical staff employees at Genesis Nursing Home, it was clear the main issue to focus my innovation on is falls. In the nursing home, the patients often fall out of wheelchairs while they are not in direct sight of a nursing home staff member. Being able to alert the staff when there is a potential fall inside of the nursing home can greatly improve the health of the patients. Using the knowledge gained from shadowing Dr. Muneses and incorporating my unique innovation, the nursing home setting will be able to take better care of its patients.

Experience Description

During my shadowing experience, I followed the everyday routine of Dr. Muneses, the medical director of Genesis Nursing Home at Franklin square. Much of the time spent at the nursing home was split into two different experiences. The first, was patient contact in the form of doing rounds to see patients in the nursing home. This was focused on diagnosing the patient and finding out what the problem was to be coming up with the best solution for that specific patient. These solutions could vary from prescribing the patient medicine, enrolling them in a physical / occupational therapy sessions, or coming up with a plan to change the patient’s lifestyle to benefit their health. The goal of the medical staff at all nursing homes is to help the patients have a pain free stay while improving their lifestyle.

The second experience at the nursing home was sitting in on board meetings to learn about the main issues that are reoccurring or have newly arise. During my time in the board meetings, is where I learned what were the most serious problems in the nursing home. In the board meetings, the significant medical staff would meet once a month and discuss the main issues in the nursing home. At the board meetings, the main problem was always the same, falls. Each patient who had fallen within the past month would be recorded and it would be noted why they fell, where they had fallen and how many times they have fallen while they have been staying at Genesis Nursing Home. One of the patients that had the most impact on my experience was an 80-year-old female that was sitting in a wheelchair in the common area alone. She had fallen asleep in the wheelchair while she was watching the TV. Once she fell asleep she had leaned forward and fallen asleep falling forward out of the chair. The reason this is hard to prevent is because, by law, the nursing home is not allowed to strap in or restrain a patient so that they do not fall out. This is when I came up with my innovation idea, my innovation was to put a device that is going to go across the patient, while sitting in a wheelchair, that will be connected to an app that sets of an alarm when it is released.

Innovation Description

My innovation consists of a physical innovation that is connected to a wheel chair, called the CareChair, and an app that the nursing staff will use along with the physical innovation. The physical innovation is an additive to existing stock wheelchairs that are now being used in nursing homes and hospitals. The time I attributed to the physical portion of the innovation was twenty hours. At first I did research on what major issue was going on in the geriatric society that needed to be fixed. It was evident that it was falls. According to the national council of aging, approximately seventy-six people pass away from falling each year. With this astonishing number in mind, I went around to Dr. Muneses and the other nursing home staff to see what they feel is the most prominent problem that needs to be fixed at Genesis Nursing Home. Each of the staff member as well as Dr. Muneses agreed with what I previously learned from my research, that falling in the nursing home was the major issue to be fixed. Dr. Muneses stated to me “The issue that leads to other major issues are falls. When a patient falls, there is such a high chance that they are going to get seriously injured because of the conditions they are in” (Muneses, 2016). My preliminary research that I conducted before asking the Genesis Nursing Home staff what they felt took me two hours. The time it took for me to converse with the staff and for them to figure out the biggest problem, was a total of two hours, and total of one hour round trip driving time.

Once I had a grasp on what my innovation was going to be, I had to physically make the innovation that was going to attach to a stock wheelchair. The additive is meant to alert the nursing home staff when a patient has potentially fallen out of the wheelchair that they were sitting in. Since my innovation attaches to the bottom of the wheelchair, I stripped the original arms of the wheelchair and replaced with wood that was spray painted black for, to make it easier to drill holes into. The wheelchairs will be equipped with metal bars and that are attached to the underneath of the arms of a wheelchair, these metal bars will go across the patient’s lap like a restraining bar. The metal bars on the CareChair do not restrain the patient from exiting the wheelchair. To create the metal bars, I had to go to Home Depot and purchase metal pipes, as well as a pipe bender so I can accurately position the bars so they will be able to go across the lap of the patient but not get into the way of the patient while they are sitting. To keep the bars closed but at little resistance, I added the male side of cabinet clips to the metal bars that go across the patient, and the female part of the cabinet clips under the arms of the chair. This ensures that the metal bars stay closed and do not swing open without pressure being applied to it. When the CareChair is on and active, the bars will be closed around the patient who is sitting in the wheelchair, if the arms are opened without the wheelchair being deactivated, an alarm will be sent to all devices that are hooked up to the CareChair app, giving the location of the wheelchair with the use of a GPS Tile and setting off a LED light attached to the back of wheelchair for easier visual clues. This was done by adding a metal spring to the bottom of the wheelchair arm, when this piece of metal meets the metal bar, it completes the circuit turning on the LED light. There is a small nine-volt lithium battery that is placed on the back of the CareChair wheelchair to power the LED light bulb.

Attached to all the CareChair wheelchairs, will be a GPS Tile. After doing research on how and what device to use to track the wheelchairs, I decided to go with Tile. The Tile will work best in the nursing home setting because it not only uses Bluetooth but it incorporates crowdsourcing. Most Bluetooth devices have a maximum range of about one hundred feet to the device it is connected to. By using crowdsourcing, if the Tile is out of range to the specific device that it is connected to, it will connect to any other device that has the Tile app on it (Tile, 2017). This makes it so there are no blind spots in the nursing home. There should never be a wheelchair that is more than one hundred feet from a computer or mobile device at any time. The GPS Tile will be connected to the CareChair app as well as Indoor Google Maps, that will allow the medical staff inside the nursing home to know the location of the wheelchairs always. With the use of the Tile, there will never be a CareChair in the nursing home that is unable to be found.

The second part to my total innovation is the CareChair app, this app will be connected to all devices in the nursing home so that there are no blind spots. The app can show the location of all the wheelchairs that have been modified by CareChair using the GPS Tile that is attached to the wheelchair. In the case of a fall, the app will send out an emergency alert to all the devices to show the exact location of the wheelchair. This allows a quick response time by a nursing home staff member so no patient is left unattended to for a long period of time.

Competition for my innovation is GPS Tracking Device Tracker Attach to Elderly Wheelchair Walker made by ElectroFlip. This devices equivalence to my innovation would be the Tile GPS tracker. The issue with the ElectroFlip device is that it costs around one hundred thirty dollars per unit. The battery on the ElectroFlip tracking device must be charges approximate every six days. This will cause unneeded hassle and when the wheelchair is being charges will have to out of commission. The GPS Tile that is used in my innovation is one hundred thirty dollars for a pack of eight units with a battery life that lasts up to one year (ElectroFlip, 2017). This is a huge advantage by being one eighth of the cost so it is more accessible by nursing homes. My CareChair innovation is also able to identify when a patient has fallen out of the wheelchair unlike the ElectroFlip.

+ Project Topic

Introduction to Topic

Everyday approximately 76 elderly people die from falling. This adds up to 27,740 people from the age sixty-five and above die each year from falling (National council on aging, 2015). A large concentration of elderly people stay in nursing homes like the one where I completed my shadowing experience, Genesis Nursing home. As a community, if we can reduce the amount of times an elderly person falls specifically in a nursing home setting, it will make a great impact on increasing the life expectancy and living quality of the elderly people.

+ Project Overview

Project Description

My final innovation project is meant to deal with a major problem that plagues nursing homes around the country. Falls and injuries due to falls need to be a serious concern to the medical staff that work in the geriatric field. During the seventy hours that I spent shadowing Dr. Muneses as the Medical Director at the nursing home, I was able to experience firsthand the everyday issues that the nursing home has when dealing with its patients. After speaking with Dr. Muneses and the other medical staff employees at Genesis Nursing Home, it was clear the main issue to focus my innovation on is falls. In the nursing home, the patients often fall out of wheelchairs while they are not in direct sight of a nursing home staff member. Being able to alert the staff when there is a potential fall inside of the nursing home can greatly improve the health of the patients. Using the knowledge gained from shadowing Dr. Muneses and incorporating my unique innovation, the nursing home setting will be able to take better care of its patients.

+ Experience

Experience Description

During my shadowing experience, I followed the everyday routine of Dr. Muneses, the medical director of Genesis Nursing Home at Franklin square. Much of the time spent at the nursing home was split into two different experiences. The first, was patient contact in the form of doing rounds to see patients in the nursing home. This was focused on diagnosing the patient and finding out what the problem was to be coming up with the best solution for that specific patient. These solutions could vary from prescribing the patient medicine, enrolling them in a physical / occupational therapy sessions, or coming up with a plan to change the patient’s lifestyle to benefit their health. The goal of the medical staff at all nursing homes is to help the patients have a pain free stay while improving their lifestyle.

The second experience at the nursing home was sitting in on board meetings to learn about the main issues that are reoccurring or have newly arise. During my time in the board meetings, is where I learned what were the most serious problems in the nursing home. In the board meetings, the significant medical staff would meet once a month and discuss the main issues in the nursing home. At the board meetings, the main problem was always the same, falls. Each patient who had fallen within the past month would be recorded and it would be noted why they fell, where they had fallen and how many times they have fallen while they have been staying at Genesis Nursing Home. One of the patients that had the most impact on my experience was an 80-year-old female that was sitting in a wheelchair in the common area alone. She had fallen asleep in the wheelchair while she was watching the TV. Once she fell asleep she had leaned forward and fallen asleep falling forward out of the chair. The reason this is hard to prevent is because, by law, the nursing home is not allowed to strap in or restrain a patient so that they do not fall out. This is when I came up with my innovation idea, my innovation was to put a device that is going to go across the patient, while sitting in a wheelchair, that will be connected to an app that sets of an alarm when it is released.

+ Innovation

Innovation Description

My innovation consists of a physical innovation that is connected to a wheel chair, called the CareChair, and an app that the nursing staff will use along with the physical innovation. The physical innovation is an additive to existing stock wheelchairs that are now being used in nursing homes and hospitals. The time I attributed to the physical portion of the innovation was twenty hours. At first I did research on what major issue was going on in the geriatric society that needed to be fixed. It was evident that it was falls. According to the national council of aging, approximately seventy-six people pass away from falling each year. With this astonishing number in mind, I went around to Dr. Muneses and the other nursing home staff to see what they feel is the most prominent problem that needs to be fixed at Genesis Nursing Home. Each of the staff member as well as Dr. Muneses agreed with what I previously learned from my research, that falling in the nursing home was the major issue to be fixed. Dr. Muneses stated to me “The issue that leads to other major issues are falls. When a patient falls, there is such a high chance that they are going to get seriously injured because of the conditions they are in” (Muneses, 2016). My preliminary research that I conducted before asking the Genesis Nursing Home staff what they felt took me two hours. The time it took for me to converse with the staff and for them to figure out the biggest problem, was a total of two hours, and total of one hour round trip driving time.

Once I had a grasp on what my innovation was going to be, I had to physically make the innovation that was going to attach to a stock wheelchair. The additive is meant to alert the nursing home staff when a patient has potentially fallen out of the wheelchair that they were sitting in. Since my innovation attaches to the bottom of the wheelchair, I stripped the original arms of the wheelchair and replaced with wood that was spray painted black for, to make it easier to drill holes into. The wheelchairs will be equipped with metal bars and that are attached to the underneath of the arms of a wheelchair, these metal bars will go across the patient’s lap like a restraining bar. The metal bars on the CareChair do not restrain the patient from exiting the wheelchair. To create the metal bars, I had to go to Home Depot and purchase metal pipes, as well as a pipe bender so I can accurately position the bars so they will be able to go across the lap of the patient but not get into the way of the patient while they are sitting. To keep the bars closed but at little resistance, I added the male side of cabinet clips to the metal bars that go across the patient, and the female part of the cabinet clips under the arms of the chair. This ensures that the metal bars stay closed and do not swing open without pressure being applied to it. When the CareChair is on and active, the bars will be closed around the patient who is sitting in the wheelchair, if the arms are opened without the wheelchair being deactivated, an alarm will be sent to all devices that are hooked up to the CareChair app, giving the location of the wheelchair with the use of a GPS Tile and setting off a LED light attached to the back of wheelchair for easier visual clues. This was done by adding a metal spring to the bottom of the wheelchair arm, when this piece of metal meets the metal bar, it completes the circuit turning on the LED light. There is a small nine-volt lithium battery that is placed on the back of the CareChair wheelchair to power the LED light bulb.

Attached to all the CareChair wheelchairs, will be a GPS Tile. After doing research on how and what device to use to track the wheelchairs, I decided to go with Tile. The Tile will work best in the nursing home setting because it not only uses Bluetooth but it incorporates crowdsourcing. Most Bluetooth devices have a maximum range of about one hundred feet to the device it is connected to. By using crowdsourcing, if the Tile is out of range to the specific device that it is connected to, it will connect to any other device that has the Tile app on it (Tile, 2017). This makes it so there are no blind spots in the nursing home. There should never be a wheelchair that is more than one hundred feet from a computer or mobile device at any time. The GPS Tile will be connected to the CareChair app as well as Indoor Google Maps, that will allow the medical staff inside the nursing home to know the location of the wheelchairs always. With the use of the Tile, there will never be a CareChair in the nursing home that is unable to be found.

The second part to my total innovation is the CareChair app, this app will be connected to all devices in the nursing home so that there are no blind spots. The app can show the location of all the wheelchairs that have been modified by CareChair using the GPS Tile that is attached to the wheelchair. In the case of a fall, the app will send out an emergency alert to all the devices to show the exact location of the wheelchair. This allows a quick response time by a nursing home staff member so no patient is left unattended to for a long period of time.

Competition for my innovation is GPS Tracking Device Tracker Attach to Elderly Wheelchair Walker made by ElectroFlip. This devices equivalence to my innovation would be the Tile GPS tracker. The issue with the ElectroFlip device is that it costs around one hundred thirty dollars per unit. The battery on the ElectroFlip tracking device must be charges approximate every six days. This will cause unneeded hassle and when the wheelchair is being charges will have to out of commission. The GPS Tile that is used in my innovation is one hundred thirty dollars for a pack of eight units with a battery life that lasts up to one year (ElectroFlip, 2017). This is a huge advantage by being one eighth of the cost so it is more accessible by nursing homes. My CareChair innovation is also able to identify when a patient has fallen out of the wheelchair unlike the ElectroFlip.

By | 2017-05-15T15:51:10+00:00 May 15th, 2017|Biomed Capstone Project 2017|0 Comments

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