Anna Farley – Independent Project

Anna Farley – Independent Project

Class of 2017

Introduction to Topic

Anesthesiology is needed in each department of surgery. It is vital to having a surgery actually be performed. Anesthesiologists control how the patient is breathing, their pain, and keeping them alive. The life of the patient is in the anesthesiologist’s hands. Anesthesiologists go through a vast amount of training and schooling to be able to operate. Anesthesiology is highly important to today’s medical society and is a necessity in the operating room. It is a fascinating topic with a potential to aid in more medical findings in the future. In every type of surgery, and on every type of person, anesthesiology tools are being used to aid patients every day.

Project Description

My project is based off an experience I had at St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Towson, Maryland. I was able to shadow the esteemed Dr. Jean Max Hogarth M.D. I was able to shadow a total of eighty hours during my experience. My innovation is based off my shadowing experience in the operating room specifically. Organization is key for an anesthesiologist while preparing for a surgery. The need for a preoperative tool for organizing anesthesiology drugs prior to their administration is essential. Drugs were strewn all over the anesthesiology station in the operating room during my experience, and, in my view, created unnecessary risks for human error.  I wanted to deal with this issue from my shadowing, and come up with an innovation that can resolve this. An organization sheet with slots for each drug/syringe, along with a Bluetooth app system to label each slot with the correct drug and the correct amount of drug in each slot is the innovation I have created. This will significantly reduce the potential for human error by emphasizing and forcing organization prior to entering the operating room. Each drug will be placed in its specific slot in its order of administration, then using the Bluetooth app the name of the drug and amount will appear on the specific slot. Once the drug is used, it will go back into the slot for protocol reasons, reassuring that it was used. Drug mishaps can end up costing a life: this can help save that life.

Experience Description

The St. Joseph’s medical center was very welcoming to me, even though it is not a teaching hospital. Dr. Jean Max Hogarth (anesthesiologist) and Sally Salvatori (nurse anesthetist) welcomed me with open arms into their world of anesthesiology. Throughout my eighty hours, I was shown how anesthesiologists operated in their everyday life. They allowed me to watch several operations with them in the operating room which was a life-changing experience. This went from cervical disc repairs, all the way to bowel resections. They both took me through the process of pre-operation with the patient and checking their levels to make sure they were able to handle anesthesia, along with the consent to anesthesia. Dr. Hogarth would have to look deep into their medical history, past or current, to decide which levels the drugs need to be at for each patient. The preparation of the operating room was abundantly thorough, along with the security to receive the drugs. I learned so many new things from: different types of professions, drugs, tools, and operations. The operation itself was incredible due to the fact that there was a live person opened up on the table. I was able to look at different angles of the body and ask the surgeon questions. Some operations were very long which allowed me to feel the exhaustion all the doctors feel every day. Specifically, on one day, I ended up fainting right outside the operating room due to not eating for awhile and long amounts of standing. When out of the operating room, Dr. Hogarth would show me the ICU, and all of the postoperative details he has to tell the nurses or put into the computer. When not in the operating room, Sally would take me around the hospital, showing me different professions and areas. I visited mechanical engineering which has taught me that I am nowhere patient enough to be an engineer. We also toured the NICU where I learned there is an intense amount of security because of people stealing babies. Being able to be in an operating room and working in a hospital, has brought me a lot of knowledge of the medical world but also has taught me about myself and my future path in professions. I am leaning towards more of a business pathway but medicine could involve the medical field, like sales or marketing.

Innovation Description

My innovation and experience go hand and hand with each other. This shadowing experience following an anesthesiologist, brought attention to so many things in the medical field that could be improved. Organization is key in any profession. It is crucial in the medical profession. This innovation I have created is completely relevant to anesthesiology and incorporates up-to –date technology. I came across this idea when my mentor, Jean Max, entered his code into the bin to receive the drugs he needs for his patient and then them haphazardly tossed them all onto his small tray station. They appeared to be in disarray. Dr. Hogarth also spoke with me while administering the drug which took his attention off the drugs and order in which he was administering them. He is a very good anesthesiologist and has a lot of experience, but even the best make mistakes. Each surgery this same thing happened, and I wondered if, at less sophisticated hospitals, with less experienced doctors, whether this could be even more of an issue. I then decided I needed to come up with something to fix this problem. My innovation may seem basic, but in the long run the percentage of mishaps with drugs will decrease rapidly.

My innovation starts with is the Bluetooth application. The anesthesiologist always has a tablet of some sort near their station. This will allow the anesthesiologist to go onto their tablet and open the application, “Rest Assured”.  This application has information pre-loaded by the anesthesiologist that includes: name, age, weight, height, type of anesthesia, type of surgery, and each drug with their specified amount – for each individual patient. The Bluetooth application will then transmit the information so that each drug will appear in a digital format on the physical sheet – with the name of the drug and the specified amount to be given. The syringes containing the specific drug and amount, (instead of being tossed onto the tray table), will then be placed individually into the specified slots on a small sheet that can hang from the anesthesiologist’s station. The slots are about five inches by five inches and there are nine slots altogether evenly spaced across this sheet. Once the drug is administered to the patient, the drug will then be put back into its specific slot for protocol reasons (counting, inventory). The materials with this innovation are cost effective and easy to maintain and control. A hospital would be able to afford the sheet, tablet, and application. This innovation took a lot of time to make (ten hours specifically). The intricacy of the application, and specificities of the organizational sheet took methodical work in creating. My shadowing experience gave me the opportunity to think out my innovation and then I was able to actually create exactly what I envisioned. In The Checklist Manifesto, simple checklists showed to make a difference with many different types of hospitals all over the world. The extra check for safety can make a world of a difference in many ways.  This would decrease the amount of mishaps immensely in the operating room, assuring that when patients are at rest, they are even safer.

+ Project Topic

Introduction to Topic

Anesthesiology is needed in each department of surgery. It is vital to having a surgery actually be performed. Anesthesiologists control how the patient is breathing, their pain, and keeping them alive. The life of the patient is in the anesthesiologist’s hands. Anesthesiologists go through a vast amount of training and schooling to be able to operate. Anesthesiology is highly important to today’s medical society and is a necessity in the operating room. It is a fascinating topic with a potential to aid in more medical findings in the future. In every type of surgery, and on every type of person, anesthesiology tools are being used to aid patients every day.

+ Project Overview

Project Description

My project is based off an experience I had at St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Towson, Maryland. I was able to shadow the esteemed Dr. Jean Max Hogarth M.D. I was able to shadow a total of eighty hours during my experience. My innovation is based off my shadowing experience in the operating room specifically. Organization is key for an anesthesiologist while preparing for a surgery. The need for a preoperative tool for organizing anesthesiology drugs prior to their administration is essential. Drugs were strewn all over the anesthesiology station in the operating room during my experience, and, in my view, created unnecessary risks for human error.  I wanted to deal with this issue from my shadowing, and come up with an innovation that can resolve this. An organization sheet with slots for each drug/syringe, along with a Bluetooth app system to label each slot with the correct drug and the correct amount of drug in each slot is the innovation I have created. This will significantly reduce the potential for human error by emphasizing and forcing organization prior to entering the operating room. Each drug will be placed in its specific slot in its order of administration, then using the Bluetooth app the name of the drug and amount will appear on the specific slot. Once the drug is used, it will go back into the slot for protocol reasons, reassuring that it was used. Drug mishaps can end up costing a life: this can help save that life.

+ Experience

Experience Description

The St. Joseph’s medical center was very welcoming to me, even though it is not a teaching hospital. Dr. Jean Max Hogarth (anesthesiologist) and Sally Salvatori (nurse anesthetist) welcomed me with open arms into their world of anesthesiology. Throughout my eighty hours, I was shown how anesthesiologists operated in their everyday life. They allowed me to watch several operations with them in the operating room which was a life-changing experience. This went from cervical disc repairs, all the way to bowel resections. They both took me through the process of pre-operation with the patient and checking their levels to make sure they were able to handle anesthesia, along with the consent to anesthesia. Dr. Hogarth would have to look deep into their medical history, past or current, to decide which levels the drugs need to be at for each patient. The preparation of the operating room was abundantly thorough, along with the security to receive the drugs. I learned so many new things from: different types of professions, drugs, tools, and operations. The operation itself was incredible due to the fact that there was a live person opened up on the table. I was able to look at different angles of the body and ask the surgeon questions. Some operations were very long which allowed me to feel the exhaustion all the doctors feel every day. Specifically, on one day, I ended up fainting right outside the operating room due to not eating for awhile and long amounts of standing. When out of the operating room, Dr. Hogarth would show me the ICU, and all of the postoperative details he has to tell the nurses or put into the computer. When not in the operating room, Sally would take me around the hospital, showing me different professions and areas. I visited mechanical engineering which has taught me that I am nowhere patient enough to be an engineer. We also toured the NICU where I learned there is an intense amount of security because of people stealing babies. Being able to be in an operating room and working in a hospital, has brought me a lot of knowledge of the medical world but also has taught me about myself and my future path in professions. I am leaning towards more of a business pathway but medicine could involve the medical field, like sales or marketing.

+ Innovation

Innovation Description

My innovation and experience go hand and hand with each other. This shadowing experience following an anesthesiologist, brought attention to so many things in the medical field that could be improved. Organization is key in any profession. It is crucial in the medical profession. This innovation I have created is completely relevant to anesthesiology and incorporates up-to –date technology. I came across this idea when my mentor, Jean Max, entered his code into the bin to receive the drugs he needs for his patient and then them haphazardly tossed them all onto his small tray station. They appeared to be in disarray. Dr. Hogarth also spoke with me while administering the drug which took his attention off the drugs and order in which he was administering them. He is a very good anesthesiologist and has a lot of experience, but even the best make mistakes. Each surgery this same thing happened, and I wondered if, at less sophisticated hospitals, with less experienced doctors, whether this could be even more of an issue. I then decided I needed to come up with something to fix this problem. My innovation may seem basic, but in the long run the percentage of mishaps with drugs will decrease rapidly.

My innovation starts with is the Bluetooth application. The anesthesiologist always has a tablet of some sort near their station. This will allow the anesthesiologist to go onto their tablet and open the application, “Rest Assured”.  This application has information pre-loaded by the anesthesiologist that includes: name, age, weight, height, type of anesthesia, type of surgery, and each drug with their specified amount – for each individual patient. The Bluetooth application will then transmit the information so that each drug will appear in a digital format on the physical sheet – with the name of the drug and the specified amount to be given. The syringes containing the specific drug and amount, (instead of being tossed onto the tray table), will then be placed individually into the specified slots on a small sheet that can hang from the anesthesiologist’s station. The slots are about five inches by five inches and there are nine slots altogether evenly spaced across this sheet. Once the drug is administered to the patient, the drug will then be put back into its specific slot for protocol reasons (counting, inventory). The materials with this innovation are cost effective and easy to maintain and control. A hospital would be able to afford the sheet, tablet, and application. This innovation took a lot of time to make (ten hours specifically). The intricacy of the application, and specificities of the organizational sheet took methodical work in creating. My shadowing experience gave me the opportunity to think out my innovation and then I was able to actually create exactly what I envisioned. In The Checklist Manifesto, simple checklists showed to make a difference with many different types of hospitals all over the world. The extra check for safety can make a world of a difference in many ways.  This would decrease the amount of mishaps immensely in the operating room, assuring that when patients are at rest, they are even safer.

By | 2017-05-15T14:54:32+00:00 May 15th, 2017|Biomed Capstone Project 2017|0 Comments

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