Anthony Chin – Independent Project

Anthony Chin – Independent Project

Class of 2017

Introduction to Topic

Over the course of my senior year, I shadowed at Laurel Bush Family Dentistry. I was able to shadow under the owner of the building, as well as their entire orthodontic staff for a total of 80 hours. Through these experiences, I based my innovation on a device used by both the general field of dentistry as well as orthodontics: a new type of dental curing light. I decided to shadow a dentist because it I believe it is an underappreciated by society and not often liked, and I wanted to learn about the field that I disliked throughout my childhood.

Project Description

Over the course of my senior year, I shadowed at Laurel Bush Family Dentistry. I was able to shadow under the owner of the building, as well as their entire orthodontic staff for a total of 80 hours. Through these experiences, I based my innovation on a device used by both the general field of dentistry as well as orthodontics: a new type of dental curing light. I decided to shadow a dentist because it I believe it is an underappreciated by society and not often liked, and I wanted to learn about the field that I disliked throughout my childhood.

Experience Description

Shadowing at Laurel Bush was an enjoyable experience. At the beginning of my shadowing, I was not completely comfortable with what I could and could not do. However, as time progressed, I became more comfortable with the staff, the patients, and the office in general. I primarily shadowed under two groups: the general dentist, and the orthodontic staff, observing from behind them, or from right next to the patient. However, I was also able to roam freely in the office and observe any procedures I found to be interesting. By being able to roam free, Laurel Bush allowed me to observe procedures that weren’t limited to my mentor’s assigned role. Some of my most memorable observations were learning about the different type of artificial tooth replacements, witnessing a fractured tooth extraction, and observing the numerous special case patients in general and orthodontic dentistry. By far, the most interesting procedure I was able to witness was a tooth extraction with bridge insertion. The patient originally came in before I was shadowing and had a dark mass around the sides of his mouth. As it turns out, it was a type of oral cancer and part of the tooth had metastasized. It was a front tooth and the tooth had to be replaced with a temporary bridge before a more permanent bridge was attached. This was the highlight of my shadowing experience as it was interesting to apply what I had already learned from shadowing and trying to determine what my mentor was trying to do without even asking them. While shadowing, I attempted to ask fewer and fewer questions the more hours I spent there. I believed that once I got an idea about procedures and the reason for doing certain them, I could predict what the dentist would do next – learning from both correct and incorrect predictions. This form of observational learning was good for reinforcing ideas I already knew, but when those interesting specialized cases came up, I asked away.

Overall, I enjoyed the experience at Laurel Bush Family Dentistry. However, although I did learn a lot, I would not want to pursue a career in this field. The special cases were the only cases that I found to be truly engaging, and they wouldn’t happen often. My mentors were able to make a fun and engaging learning environment, but more often than not, I felt stagnant. It wouldn’t help that I would have to walk to the office toward the middle to end of my shadowing experience due to an issue with transportation, or the fact that I was forced to remain standing throughout all my shadowing. Also, although the staff was okay with me observing, I’m not sure if all the patients were aware and/or comfortable with that idea. For that reason, I would stay away from certain procedures, limiting my ability to learn through observation. Overall I believe shadowing at Laurel Bush was a good experience. It has taught me a lot about the importance of dental health, and I now have a new found respect for those who are so dedicated to the dental profession.

Innovation Description

My innovation is based on the dental curing light and is known as the Resin Dispensing Dental Light. Instead of being a traditional light, it also contains an injection system capable of adding the necessary materials for a proper cavity placement or bracket insertion. The overall shape is a hybrid between an electric toothbrush and a normal dental curing light, and it has a cylindrical tube that’s separate from the main body and holds the necessary resins for the procedure. The frame will be made out of a polypropylene, a lightweight composite material that is a thermoplastic polymer, a polymer that can also withstand the high temperatures of an autoclave and the LED bulb (The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica). This plastic can also be injection molded – making it easier to manufacture (The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica). There will also be a small piece of clear orange plastic used to protect the user’s eyes from the bright blue light. The user interface on the handle of the device will connect to a circuit board and wiring. It will include controls about the type of lighting curing it is doing and the time interval. The standard options are high power, normal, and adhere, and all these options will have 5, 10, and 25-second intervals (Miller, 2009). A digital screen found on the outside of the tool to indicate the options. Once the correct options have been selected, the resin can be dispensed or the light can be activated by pressing on their assigned button.

At the base, the will be a rechargeable battery that connects to a base charging station via USB-C (The battery can is also removable and should be when the body is undergoing cleaning). The base charger station connects to a wall outlet. Also found at the base is the separate cylinder containing two spots for the resins necessary for a filling. These fillings are placed inside the tube through a side door that can be opened. The tip of the tube is first screwed in to provide a seal for tube and the primary body and the back of the tube are placed in afterward. The resin is then pushed through the tool through a small motor that pushes on the back of the resin tubes similar to how a syringe works. The resin travels through the body and is excreted from the top of the body.

The top of the body contains the LED bulbs as well as two nozzles that excrete each of the resin. The nozzles are found on the outer edge of the light bulb and color coded for a corresponding resin. Eight small LEDS emit a bright blue light that is magnified through a mirrored based and a focused clear plastic covering to concentrate the light in a specific area. For cleaning, the top part can detach and both pieces can be cleaned individually. To disassemble, the operator will hold the button on the back of the device while unscrewing the top portion.  The parts can easily be put back together by reversing the process, and a rubber gasket makes an airtight seal for the resin to pass back through. The electronics will still be functional even if the device detaches as the parts will come into contact via metal contact points on areas where the threads meet.

What makes the device unique is that no current dental curing lights currently exist where it has built in filling capabilities. Current models such as the VALO LED Curing Light and the Demi Ultra Curing light are currently the most modern on the market, providing interval usage and safety. The modern market is saturated with models by ACTEON, 3M, and Practicon (Dental Compare). These companies all have dental curing lights, but none of them have the resin carrying capabilities. The S.P.E.C. 3 by Coltene used at Laurel Bush is no different. While shadowing, I was able to witness multiple instances were a dental curing light and a filling was used in tandem, and it was not efficient. A majority of the time, a dental assistant had to be present to pass the syringes of resin, wasting time for both the operator and the patient. Dental curing lights have a wide range of uses – it can be used on sealants, used to fillings, and even used to secure brace brackets – but it lacks efficiency in how broad its uses are. After witnessing multiple instances of this, I researched the technology and created the Resin Dispensing Dental Light. This tool not only makes the entire process more efficient, but it also keeps its application abilities open. At least one of the resins – the dental etching solution – is applicable to a majority of dental procedures, and any type of resin could be used in this device as long as it fits within the primary resin holder and the device is clean. This tool allows dentists to work independently with ease and aids them in how they operate on patients.

+ Project Topic

Introduction to Topic

Over the course of my senior year, I shadowed at Laurel Bush Family Dentistry. I was able to shadow under the owner of the building, as well as their entire orthodontic staff for a total of 80 hours. Through these experiences, I based my innovation on a device used by both the general field of dentistry as well as orthodontics: a new type of dental curing light. I decided to shadow a dentist because it I believe it is an underappreciated by society and not often liked, and I wanted to learn about the field that I disliked throughout my childhood.

+ Project Overview

Project Description

Over the course of my senior year, I shadowed at Laurel Bush Family Dentistry. I was able to shadow under the owner of the building, as well as their entire orthodontic staff for a total of 80 hours. Through these experiences, I based my innovation on a device used by both the general field of dentistry as well as orthodontics: a new type of dental curing light. I decided to shadow a dentist because it I believe it is an underappreciated by society and not often liked, and I wanted to learn about the field that I disliked throughout my childhood.

+ Experience

Experience Description

Shadowing at Laurel Bush was an enjoyable experience. At the beginning of my shadowing, I was not completely comfortable with what I could and could not do. However, as time progressed, I became more comfortable with the staff, the patients, and the office in general. I primarily shadowed under two groups: the general dentist, and the orthodontic staff, observing from behind them, or from right next to the patient. However, I was also able to roam freely in the office and observe any procedures I found to be interesting. By being able to roam free, Laurel Bush allowed me to observe procedures that weren’t limited to my mentor’s assigned role. Some of my most memorable observations were learning about the different type of artificial tooth replacements, witnessing a fractured tooth extraction, and observing the numerous special case patients in general and orthodontic dentistry. By far, the most interesting procedure I was able to witness was a tooth extraction with bridge insertion. The patient originally came in before I was shadowing and had a dark mass around the sides of his mouth. As it turns out, it was a type of oral cancer and part of the tooth had metastasized. It was a front tooth and the tooth had to be replaced with a temporary bridge before a more permanent bridge was attached. This was the highlight of my shadowing experience as it was interesting to apply what I had already learned from shadowing and trying to determine what my mentor was trying to do without even asking them. While shadowing, I attempted to ask fewer and fewer questions the more hours I spent there. I believed that once I got an idea about procedures and the reason for doing certain them, I could predict what the dentist would do next – learning from both correct and incorrect predictions. This form of observational learning was good for reinforcing ideas I already knew, but when those interesting specialized cases came up, I asked away.

Overall, I enjoyed the experience at Laurel Bush Family Dentistry. However, although I did learn a lot, I would not want to pursue a career in this field. The special cases were the only cases that I found to be truly engaging, and they wouldn’t happen often. My mentors were able to make a fun and engaging learning environment, but more often than not, I felt stagnant. It wouldn’t help that I would have to walk to the office toward the middle to end of my shadowing experience due to an issue with transportation, or the fact that I was forced to remain standing throughout all my shadowing. Also, although the staff was okay with me observing, I’m not sure if all the patients were aware and/or comfortable with that idea. For that reason, I would stay away from certain procedures, limiting my ability to learn through observation. Overall I believe shadowing at Laurel Bush was a good experience. It has taught me a lot about the importance of dental health, and I now have a new found respect for those who are so dedicated to the dental profession.

+ Innovation

Innovation Description

My innovation is based on the dental curing light and is known as the Resin Dispensing Dental Light. Instead of being a traditional light, it also contains an injection system capable of adding the necessary materials for a proper cavity placement or bracket insertion. The overall shape is a hybrid between an electric toothbrush and a normal dental curing light, and it has a cylindrical tube that’s separate from the main body and holds the necessary resins for the procedure. The frame will be made out of a polypropylene, a lightweight composite material that is a thermoplastic polymer, a polymer that can also withstand the high temperatures of an autoclave and the LED bulb (The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica). This plastic can also be injection molded – making it easier to manufacture (The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica). There will also be a small piece of clear orange plastic used to protect the user’s eyes from the bright blue light. The user interface on the handle of the device will connect to a circuit board and wiring. It will include controls about the type of lighting curing it is doing and the time interval. The standard options are high power, normal, and adhere, and all these options will have 5, 10, and 25-second intervals (Miller, 2009). A digital screen found on the outside of the tool to indicate the options. Once the correct options have been selected, the resin can be dispensed or the light can be activated by pressing on their assigned button.

At the base, the will be a rechargeable battery that connects to a base charging station via USB-C (The battery can is also removable and should be when the body is undergoing cleaning). The base charger station connects to a wall outlet. Also found at the base is the separate cylinder containing two spots for the resins necessary for a filling. These fillings are placed inside the tube through a side door that can be opened. The tip of the tube is first screwed in to provide a seal for tube and the primary body and the back of the tube are placed in afterward. The resin is then pushed through the tool through a small motor that pushes on the back of the resin tubes similar to how a syringe works. The resin travels through the body and is excreted from the top of the body.

The top of the body contains the LED bulbs as well as two nozzles that excrete each of the resin. The nozzles are found on the outer edge of the light bulb and color coded for a corresponding resin. Eight small LEDS emit a bright blue light that is magnified through a mirrored based and a focused clear plastic covering to concentrate the light in a specific area. For cleaning, the top part can detach and both pieces can be cleaned individually. To disassemble, the operator will hold the button on the back of the device while unscrewing the top portion.  The parts can easily be put back together by reversing the process, and a rubber gasket makes an airtight seal for the resin to pass back through. The electronics will still be functional even if the device detaches as the parts will come into contact via metal contact points on areas where the threads meet.

What makes the device unique is that no current dental curing lights currently exist where it has built in filling capabilities. Current models such as the VALO LED Curing Light and the Demi Ultra Curing light are currently the most modern on the market, providing interval usage and safety. The modern market is saturated with models by ACTEON, 3M, and Practicon (Dental Compare). These companies all have dental curing lights, but none of them have the resin carrying capabilities. The S.P.E.C. 3 by Coltene used at Laurel Bush is no different. While shadowing, I was able to witness multiple instances were a dental curing light and a filling was used in tandem, and it was not efficient. A majority of the time, a dental assistant had to be present to pass the syringes of resin, wasting time for both the operator and the patient. Dental curing lights have a wide range of uses – it can be used on sealants, used to fillings, and even used to secure brace brackets – but it lacks efficiency in how broad its uses are. After witnessing multiple instances of this, I researched the technology and created the Resin Dispensing Dental Light. This tool not only makes the entire process more efficient, but it also keeps its application abilities open. At least one of the resins – the dental etching solution – is applicable to a majority of dental procedures, and any type of resin could be used in this device as long as it fits within the primary resin holder and the device is clean. This tool allows dentists to work independently with ease and aids them in how they operate on patients.

By | 2017-05-12T02:50:38+00:00 May 12th, 2017|Biomed Capstone Project 2017|0 Comments

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