Ashley Jazombek – Independent Project

Ashley Jazombek – Independent Project

Class of 2017

Introduction to Topic

As coronary artery disease (CAD) remains on the rise, so do the several consequences that come with it. Interventional cardiology focuses on the measures taken before extremely invasive surgery becomes necessary: concentrating on less-intrusive methods to remove plaque and build-up in coronary walls and arteries. With heart disease globally scaled as the number one cause of death, its numbers are still expected to grow: predicting a total of 23.6 million deaths by 2030 (American, 2017). One of the costs for the several procedures that one must undergo due to challenges with their heart is damage to the kidneys (Voss, 2016). While attempting to repair one vital organ, a patient should not have to suffer the injuries of another.

Project Description

My goal for the project surfaced to directly cooperate with the modernization in the office and laboratory of an interventional cardiologist. Because I was unable to jump at the chance to observe a fully-invasive surgery – one being done to a patient far worse-off than those who were in the beginning stages of those I had seen – the doctors in which I was introduced to work with were constantly directing me to inspect and reflect the common tools and techniques being utilized. In doing so, I was engaging in the processes of the cardiologists: opening my mind to new ideas to correct the current practices in any way that I could throughout the seventy hours spent shadowing Dr. Winakur, my main mentor, along with her colleges: Dr. Voss, Dr. Albornoz, and Dr. Smith. It was important to recognize the endless collaboration along with the ideal efficiency that takes place every day in this branch of a hospital. A patient typically first begins with an appointment in the cardiology branch, and then may continue onward to the catheterization lab with another set of professionals. The cooperation and compassion that each of my mentors shared with each other, their patients, and even myself, led me to recognize the importance of not only their primary organ, but how each organ also cooperates with one another in order to allow the human body to function as a whole.

Experience Description

My shadowing experience had taken place between Dr. Winakur’s cardiology office and the catheterization lab of St. Agnes Hospital. Most of her time spent at St. Agnes in in the cardiology office besides to the St. Agnes Hospital. Because Dr. Winakur is part of the Maryland Cardiovascular Specialists, she along with the other cardiologists take care of patients with heart and cardiovascular diseases through an array of cardiovascular testing services, treatments and interventional cardiology. The practice consists of board certified physicians in cardiovascular medicine with more than 50 years of combined experience skilled and trained in all areas of cardiovascular medicine, including nuclear cardiology, interventional cardiology and electrophysiology. Around the office, Dr. Winakur makes her rounds amongst her scheduled patients all day long. The majority of her patients see her strictly for cardiovascular health – such as prior to scheduling a big surgery, or follow-ups to be sent to the surgeon themselves. Dr. Winakur’s testing done at the office, along with her approval is crucial in determining the outlook of several patient’s current lives. She may have the patients sent for many specific tests, such as one of two stress-tests; or potentially the patient will leave the office and enter the cardiology wing of the hospital for an echocardiogram – perhaps even a transesophageal echocardiogram. In a section part of the cardiology wing lies that catheterization lab; this is where procedures such as an angiogram or angioplasty may take place.

Dr. Winakur is very reputable due to the close bonds she is able to form with the majority of her patients, and she always goes out of her way to ensure that the best care is provided to them, along with constant upkeep being maintained for better health. She is able to do this by regularly requiring her check-ups, and also enforcing goal-keeping amongst her patients: making them strive to form better and healthier choices for their hearts and families. One thing that Dr. Winakur does on the side is focus on an individual’s overall health – not centering on the heart. She specifically does this by listening carefully to her patients and deciphering if there is any underlying causes contributing to the risk-factors present in her patients’ lives. A major contributing factor is obesity: something that many of her patients suffer with, along with cardiac patients world-wide. Although this was very thoughtful of Dr. Winkaur, and I completely understand the underlying motives for her desires to help maintain the weight with her patients – I feel that it was almost just another job that she felt obligated to take on. Furthermore, Dr. Winakur continued to go out of her way and put time aside for patients in which she almost took on a sort of “counselor” role. By doing so, Dr. Winakur was able to set goals with her patients regarding their personal outlooks in shaping their potentials of improving their lifestyle habits. In the catheterization lab, spent shadowing Dr. Voss and Dr. Albornoz, I was able to study and learn the techniques that these cardiologists utilize everyday – along with the issues and the procedure that I would extend upon and create my innovation with. Because I wasn’t of age to be in the actual operating room with the cardiologists, the men and technicians were more than helpful in explaining to me everything that was going on and how everything was happening. Many of the technicians were even generous enough to print me out photos of patients’ hearts as angiograms were taking place so that I could use it for reference and for journaling purposes. Dr. Voss also sat with me for long periods of time to discuss exactly what problems he had with the current systems he was dealing with. As I was gaining all of this brand new information about this small and specific, yet expanding branch of cardiology, I was able to grasp a new understanding of exactly what Dr. Voss, or any cardiologist may be seeing.

Innovation Description

Although many different innovative ideas hatched in my mind throughout my shadowing experience, one issue that so many patients continue to face stuck in my mind: renal failure. The organs of the human body is one of the world’s most amazing processes: constant motion working together in order to allow a human being to live. Without one of their bodily functions, in specific – an organ – the body cannot and will not be able to function properly on its own. This is portrayed indirectly as many cardiologists have to pick and choose what they want to save – ultimately in the end choosing their job and fixing the coronary artery before choosing to think about the other body parts. My innovation gives cardiologists the ability to not have to choose which matters more for the patient. With the consistent amount of dyes and other harmful things being placed into the body during these routine procedures, especially in the angiograms, the kidneys are the first – and possibly only – to take a severe hit in the long run (National, 2015). First, with my cardiologist, we discussed the problems and procedures that correlate with renal failure, and more specifically to angiograms, contrast-induced-nephropathy (CIN). The risk of gaining CIN increases as the amount of risk-factors a patient has increases (National, 2015). The positive correlation between the two almost makes the kidney disorders a given – as the risk factors are the prime motivators for the heart disease and plaque buildup itself, it is now also the prime motivator as to how these medical issues expand.  I spent a lot of time researching the different dyes that were used through the angiograms, and how they have gotten better over the years that they have been utilized. My initial thought while shadowing in August was that I could utilize skills from chemistry and biology in order to create a newer, safer, iodine-based dye that would remain heart-healthy. After speaking to Dr. Winakur about this, I was immediately discouraged with the difficulty of that idea and how I would be able to do such a complicated process by myself. It was after this that I figured an alternative to creating the new dye; instead I could create a new filtration process that would divert the harm from the kidneys and push it into an already man-made machine – the hemodialysis machine. This idea stems from the there being no yet known strategy to prevent the impacts of dye and other harmful substances attacking the body’s kidneys. The currently made hemodialysis suffers with patients they may be regularly involved with angiograms and angioplasties (Constantinescu, 2015). Hemodialysis variables change from patient to patient, but they entirely rely amongst a patient’s own health at the time – including their risk factors of obesity, diabetes, previous surgeries, and more importantly: their vascular conditions and weavings of their arteries. This is crucial to understand because there truly is no known solution for the counteraction of kidney disease that patients face after a coronary procedure, and utilizing hemodialysis fits perfectly into the “what could be”. To begin this idea, after conclusive research, I went on the computer device, Sketchup, in order to layout what the hemodialysis machine resembles. To begin, I drew a 2-Dimentional image of what my hemodialysis box was supposed to resemble and form as. Following that, I clicked on the “push/pull” button, which then allowed me to push and pull face entities to sculpt to transform my once 2-Dimentional box into the 3-D model that it had become. This was utilized in order to create the base of the object created. Next, on the object itself, I drew other 2-D images to resemble buttons and gages that are found on a hemodialysis machine. With these, I followed the same beginning process: stacking 2-D images on top of each other again, and again then transforming them into a recognizable prototype. This process took up a lot of time due to the research of the machine’s functioning and how it looks. This model of the design gives a brief look into the simplistic, yet very necessary technique that this important machine attributes to the entire field of cardiology. Along with the model created on my laptop, I created multiple marketing websites to further expand the idea of incorporating the dialysis machine while in a cardiac setting. First selecting a domain on the website WordPress, I was able to manipulate the settings and themes to better fit the overall “look” I wanted my innovation to receive. The website not only shows viewers up-to-date research, but also gives those in tricky situations an idea of what could be. Luckily for patients of cardiology world-wide, there is now an option that can better a patient’s standard of living: being hooked up to a dialysis machine during a procedure itself rather than for the rest of their lives – just to receive clean blood through their bodies. The website marketing the product also proves to patients and others viewing what its purposes truly are; all the while being available towards all patients in whichever mode they may wish to explore the product. The innovation has linked itself to this website through Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter – broadcasting the information in the social media in order to better enhance the mobility and growth of the product. Overall, the innovation I have established opens doors to the constantly changing and improving methods of cardiologists.

+ Project Topic

Introduction to Topic

As coronary artery disease (CAD) remains on the rise, so do the several consequences that come with it. Interventional cardiology focuses on the measures taken before extremely invasive surgery becomes necessary: concentrating on less-intrusive methods to remove plaque and build-up in coronary walls and arteries. With heart disease globally scaled as the number one cause of death, its numbers are still expected to grow: predicting a total of 23.6 million deaths by 2030 (American, 2017). One of the costs for the several procedures that one must undergo due to challenges with their heart is damage to the kidneys (Voss, 2016). While attempting to repair one vital organ, a patient should not have to suffer the injuries of another.

+ Project Overview

Project Description

My goal for the project surfaced to directly cooperate with the modernization in the office and laboratory of an interventional cardiologist. Because I was unable to jump at the chance to observe a fully-invasive surgery – one being done to a patient far worse-off than those who were in the beginning stages of those I had seen – the doctors in which I was introduced to work with were constantly directing me to inspect and reflect the common tools and techniques being utilized. In doing so, I was engaging in the processes of the cardiologists: opening my mind to new ideas to correct the current practices in any way that I could throughout the seventy hours spent shadowing Dr. Winakur, my main mentor, along with her colleges: Dr. Voss, Dr. Albornoz, and Dr. Smith. It was important to recognize the endless collaboration along with the ideal efficiency that takes place every day in this branch of a hospital. A patient typically first begins with an appointment in the cardiology branch, and then may continue onward to the catheterization lab with another set of professionals. The cooperation and compassion that each of my mentors shared with each other, their patients, and even myself, led me to recognize the importance of not only their primary organ, but how each organ also cooperates with one another in order to allow the human body to function as a whole.

+ Experience

Experience Description

My shadowing experience had taken place between Dr. Winakur’s cardiology office and the catheterization lab of St. Agnes Hospital. Most of her time spent at St. Agnes in in the cardiology office besides to the St. Agnes Hospital. Because Dr. Winakur is part of the Maryland Cardiovascular Specialists, she along with the other cardiologists take care of patients with heart and cardiovascular diseases through an array of cardiovascular testing services, treatments and interventional cardiology. The practice consists of board certified physicians in cardiovascular medicine with more than 50 years of combined experience skilled and trained in all areas of cardiovascular medicine, including nuclear cardiology, interventional cardiology and electrophysiology. Around the office, Dr. Winakur makes her rounds amongst her scheduled patients all day long. The majority of her patients see her strictly for cardiovascular health – such as prior to scheduling a big surgery, or follow-ups to be sent to the surgeon themselves. Dr. Winakur’s testing done at the office, along with her approval is crucial in determining the outlook of several patient’s current lives. She may have the patients sent for many specific tests, such as one of two stress-tests; or potentially the patient will leave the office and enter the cardiology wing of the hospital for an echocardiogram – perhaps even a transesophageal echocardiogram. In a section part of the cardiology wing lies that catheterization lab; this is where procedures such as an angiogram or angioplasty may take place.

Dr. Winakur is very reputable due to the close bonds she is able to form with the majority of her patients, and she always goes out of her way to ensure that the best care is provided to them, along with constant upkeep being maintained for better health. She is able to do this by regularly requiring her check-ups, and also enforcing goal-keeping amongst her patients: making them strive to form better and healthier choices for their hearts and families. One thing that Dr. Winakur does on the side is focus on an individual’s overall health – not centering on the heart. She specifically does this by listening carefully to her patients and deciphering if there is any underlying causes contributing to the risk-factors present in her patients’ lives. A major contributing factor is obesity: something that many of her patients suffer with, along with cardiac patients world-wide. Although this was very thoughtful of Dr. Winkaur, and I completely understand the underlying motives for her desires to help maintain the weight with her patients – I feel that it was almost just another job that she felt obligated to take on. Furthermore, Dr. Winakur continued to go out of her way and put time aside for patients in which she almost took on a sort of “counselor” role. By doing so, Dr. Winakur was able to set goals with her patients regarding their personal outlooks in shaping their potentials of improving their lifestyle habits. In the catheterization lab, spent shadowing Dr. Voss and Dr. Albornoz, I was able to study and learn the techniques that these cardiologists utilize everyday – along with the issues and the procedure that I would extend upon and create my innovation with. Because I wasn’t of age to be in the actual operating room with the cardiologists, the men and technicians were more than helpful in explaining to me everything that was going on and how everything was happening. Many of the technicians were even generous enough to print me out photos of patients’ hearts as angiograms were taking place so that I could use it for reference and for journaling purposes. Dr. Voss also sat with me for long periods of time to discuss exactly what problems he had with the current systems he was dealing with. As I was gaining all of this brand new information about this small and specific, yet expanding branch of cardiology, I was able to grasp a new understanding of exactly what Dr. Voss, or any cardiologist may be seeing.

+ Innovation

Innovation Description

Although many different innovative ideas hatched in my mind throughout my shadowing experience, one issue that so many patients continue to face stuck in my mind: renal failure. The organs of the human body is one of the world’s most amazing processes: constant motion working together in order to allow a human being to live. Without one of their bodily functions, in specific – an organ – the body cannot and will not be able to function properly on its own. This is portrayed indirectly as many cardiologists have to pick and choose what they want to save – ultimately in the end choosing their job and fixing the coronary artery before choosing to think about the other body parts. My innovation gives cardiologists the ability to not have to choose which matters more for the patient. With the consistent amount of dyes and other harmful things being placed into the body during these routine procedures, especially in the angiograms, the kidneys are the first – and possibly only – to take a severe hit in the long run (National, 2015). First, with my cardiologist, we discussed the problems and procedures that correlate with renal failure, and more specifically to angiograms, contrast-induced-nephropathy (CIN). The risk of gaining CIN increases as the amount of risk-factors a patient has increases (National, 2015). The positive correlation between the two almost makes the kidney disorders a given – as the risk factors are the prime motivators for the heart disease and plaque buildup itself, it is now also the prime motivator as to how these medical issues expand.  I spent a lot of time researching the different dyes that were used through the angiograms, and how they have gotten better over the years that they have been utilized. My initial thought while shadowing in August was that I could utilize skills from chemistry and biology in order to create a newer, safer, iodine-based dye that would remain heart-healthy. After speaking to Dr. Winakur about this, I was immediately discouraged with the difficulty of that idea and how I would be able to do such a complicated process by myself. It was after this that I figured an alternative to creating the new dye; instead I could create a new filtration process that would divert the harm from the kidneys and push it into an already man-made machine – the hemodialysis machine. This idea stems from the there being no yet known strategy to prevent the impacts of dye and other harmful substances attacking the body’s kidneys. The currently made hemodialysis suffers with patients they may be regularly involved with angiograms and angioplasties (Constantinescu, 2015). Hemodialysis variables change from patient to patient, but they entirely rely amongst a patient’s own health at the time – including their risk factors of obesity, diabetes, previous surgeries, and more importantly: their vascular conditions and weavings of their arteries. This is crucial to understand because there truly is no known solution for the counteraction of kidney disease that patients face after a coronary procedure, and utilizing hemodialysis fits perfectly into the “what could be”. To begin this idea, after conclusive research, I went on the computer device, Sketchup, in order to layout what the hemodialysis machine resembles. To begin, I drew a 2-Dimentional image of what my hemodialysis box was supposed to resemble and form as. Following that, I clicked on the “push/pull” button, which then allowed me to push and pull face entities to sculpt to transform my once 2-Dimentional box into the 3-D model that it had become. This was utilized in order to create the base of the object created. Next, on the object itself, I drew other 2-D images to resemble buttons and gages that are found on a hemodialysis machine. With these, I followed the same beginning process: stacking 2-D images on top of each other again, and again then transforming them into a recognizable prototype. This process took up a lot of time due to the research of the machine’s functioning and how it looks. This model of the design gives a brief look into the simplistic, yet very necessary technique that this important machine attributes to the entire field of cardiology. Along with the model created on my laptop, I created multiple marketing websites to further expand the idea of incorporating the dialysis machine while in a cardiac setting. First selecting a domain on the website WordPress, I was able to manipulate the settings and themes to better fit the overall “look” I wanted my innovation to receive. The website not only shows viewers up-to-date research, but also gives those in tricky situations an idea of what could be. Luckily for patients of cardiology world-wide, there is now an option that can better a patient’s standard of living: being hooked up to a dialysis machine during a procedure itself rather than for the rest of their lives – just to receive clean blood through their bodies. The website marketing the product also proves to patients and others viewing what its purposes truly are; all the while being available towards all patients in whichever mode they may wish to explore the product. The innovation has linked itself to this website through Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter – broadcasting the information in the social media in order to better enhance the mobility and growth of the product. Overall, the innovation I have established opens doors to the constantly changing and improving methods of cardiologists.

By | 2017-05-12T02:42:54+00:00 May 12th, 2017|Biomed Capstone Project 2017|0 Comments

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