Connor Addy – Independent Project

Connor Addy – Independent Project

Class of 2017

Introduction to Topic

The focus of the independent project innovation created is orthopedic patient education, which is typically information used to inform patients of orthopedic professionals about surgeries and conditions which are affecting them. This was chosen to be the focus because some materials currently used for orthopedic patient education are composed of insufficient information to present the patient with all risks and details about the procedure, or are too complex for an average patient to understand.

Project Description

The final independent project created is a patient education pamphlet for orthopedic conditions associated with the knee. For many shadowing experiences it was hard for me to decide what issue to address for the project, but suddenly it hit me. After seeing patients struggle to understand what their condition or operation was, I decided that patient education was the right direction to go. The knee was choses as the focus of my innovation because it is a bit simpler anatomically than the complex shoulder. The next step was to start creating a SketchUp of the knee. This was the most difficult part of the creative process, but after working on it for a few days the results were noticeable. A color coded model had been created, and the structures of the knee were finally in place. The next step was to condense important information into a pamphlet. I focused on two particular surgeries, ACL reconstruction and meniscectomies. These were common from my shadowing experiences and are some of the better surgeries to simplify for patients. After this it was simply a matter of refining the brochure to be aesthetically pleasing and contain all of the necessary information.

Experience Description

Overall, I had a very successful shadowing experience with my mentor and orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Tredinnick. On the first day of shadowing I began by getting a general sense of his work during office hours. His responsibilities were primarily to visit patients and diagnose them depending on their symptoms and imaging results. Typically, Dr. Tredinnick would review a patient’s previous visits and images before meeting with them so he had a better sense of what to expect upon seeing the patient. In many cases a diagnosis could even be made before speaking with the patient, whose symptoms would normally confirm the diagnosis. The most common conditions patients were diagnosed with over the course of my shadowing experience were arthritis of the knee, degenerative disk disease of the vertebrae, frozen shoulder, and rotator cuff tears. Severe arthritis and rotator cuff tears are treated through surgical means, whereas degenerative disk disease and frozen shoulder are better suited to be treated through physical therapy. I certainly learned that there are varying and unique orthopedic conditions that affect patients in different way. An example of this is when my mentor said he treats the patient, not the condition 3 the patient has. What he meant by this is that depending on the comfort level of the patient given their injury, they may or may not need treatment. For example, a patient with severe arthritis may feel okay and not undergo knee replacement surgery yet, but a patient with moderate arthritis could be in severe pain and undergo surgery at that time. The most interesting thing I encountered during the shadowing experiences was a patient with a condition known as pots syndrome. This causes the patient to pass out unexpectedly, especially from stress, and caused them to fall often and damage each shoulder. My shadowing experiences not only taught me significant details about the workings of orthopedic treatments, but what it takes to be a surgeon and the importance of correctly diagnosing and treating patients. I also learned that imaging is extremely important to diagnosing patients. I am completely satisfied with my shadowing experience which allowed me to gain enough information to complete my independent project. I am grateful to have had the opportunity to shadow Dr. Tredinnick over the course of my senior year.

Innovation Description

Since I completed 80 hours of journals it was my responsibility to have an innovation demonstrated by 10 hours of completed work. The first part of the innovation, a model of the knee created Sketchup, was the majority of the time spent on the innovation. This consisted of first creating the tibia, fibula, and femur aligned correctly to demonstrate anatomical correctness. Once this was completed, the next step was to add in the posterior cruciate ligament, anterior cruciate ligament, lateral collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament. This was the most difficult part because had to be formed and connected in the proper places. After constructing these ligaments, the meniscus and articular cartilage were inserted on the tibia and femur, respectively. The next step was to color code all surfaces corresponding to a particular anatomical feature, and finally selecting the best view to display on the brochure. This process took somewhere between 6 and 7 hours. The additional 3 to 4 hours were completed during the design of the brochure, the final product. Some of this time was in deciding what information to include. Eventually I decided to use the diagram to explain two operations, the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and a meniscectomy. The remaining time was spent organizing the content in the brochure and ensuring it was an aesthetically pleasing product. I

I came to create this product through my shadowing experiences. After learning the intricacies of these operations through my mentor it became clear to me that patients were not fully comprehending the operations that they were undergoing, especially for these two specific surgeries used in the independent project. During the project itself the learning process was primarily present in SketchUp. Although I had used the program before, it had been a while and there were tools that were necessary to relearn, as well as new tools that had to be learned for the first time to accurately create the model. The function of the innovation is to make it easier for patients of orthopedic surgeons and other orthopedic professionals to understand the operations being done on their knee. The problems addressed by this particular brochure compared to others currently present are that it simplifies medical terminologies and uses a simplistic three dimensional color coded model to depict the different anatomical features present within the knee. An example of using simplified medical terminology is referring to the tibia as the shin bone, and labeling it as such in the diagram. The model is more effective than others currently being used because the patella is removed for an interior view of the knee, and there is no overlapping of tissue which makes it difficult to distinguish between the different tissues present in the knee. There are currently many forms of orthopedic patient education available to patients, but nearly all of them suffer from the same two problems my brochure was intended to fix, confusing pictures and unknown medical terminologies. My product is of a greater simplicity than other products, but retains its effectiveness.

+ Project Topic

Introduction to Topic

The focus of the independent project innovation created is orthopedic patient education, which is typically information used to inform patients of orthopedic professionals about surgeries and conditions which are affecting them. This was chosen to be the focus because some materials currently used for orthopedic patient education are composed of insufficient information to present the patient with all risks and details about the procedure, or are too complex for an average patient to understand.

+ Project Overview

Project Description

The final independent project created is a patient education pamphlet for orthopedic conditions associated with the knee. For many shadowing experiences it was hard for me to decide what issue to address for the project, but suddenly it hit me. After seeing patients struggle to understand what their condition or operation was, I decided that patient education was the right direction to go. The knee was choses as the focus of my innovation because it is a bit simpler anatomically than the complex shoulder. The next step was to start creating a SketchUp of the knee. This was the most difficult part of the creative process, but after working on it for a few days the results were noticeable. A color coded model had been created, and the structures of the knee were finally in place. The next step was to condense important information into a pamphlet. I focused on two particular surgeries, ACL reconstruction and meniscectomies. These were common from my shadowing experiences and are some of the better surgeries to simplify for patients. After this it was simply a matter of refining the brochure to be aesthetically pleasing and contain all of the necessary information.

+ Experience

Experience Description

Overall, I had a very successful shadowing experience with my mentor and orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Tredinnick. On the first day of shadowing I began by getting a general sense of his work during office hours. His responsibilities were primarily to visit patients and diagnose them depending on their symptoms and imaging results. Typically, Dr. Tredinnick would review a patient’s previous visits and images before meeting with them so he had a better sense of what to expect upon seeing the patient. In many cases a diagnosis could even be made before speaking with the patient, whose symptoms would normally confirm the diagnosis. The most common conditions patients were diagnosed with over the course of my shadowing experience were arthritis of the knee, degenerative disk disease of the vertebrae, frozen shoulder, and rotator cuff tears. Severe arthritis and rotator cuff tears are treated through surgical means, whereas degenerative disk disease and frozen shoulder are better suited to be treated through physical therapy. I certainly learned that there are varying and unique orthopedic conditions that affect patients in different way. An example of this is when my mentor said he treats the patient, not the condition 3 the patient has. What he meant by this is that depending on the comfort level of the patient given their injury, they may or may not need treatment. For example, a patient with severe arthritis may feel okay and not undergo knee replacement surgery yet, but a patient with moderate arthritis could be in severe pain and undergo surgery at that time. The most interesting thing I encountered during the shadowing experiences was a patient with a condition known as pots syndrome. This causes the patient to pass out unexpectedly, especially from stress, and caused them to fall often and damage each shoulder. My shadowing experiences not only taught me significant details about the workings of orthopedic treatments, but what it takes to be a surgeon and the importance of correctly diagnosing and treating patients. I also learned that imaging is extremely important to diagnosing patients. I am completely satisfied with my shadowing experience which allowed me to gain enough information to complete my independent project. I am grateful to have had the opportunity to shadow Dr. Tredinnick over the course of my senior year.

+ Innovation

Innovation Description

Since I completed 80 hours of journals it was my responsibility to have an innovation demonstrated by 10 hours of completed work. The first part of the innovation, a model of the knee created Sketchup, was the majority of the time spent on the innovation. This consisted of first creating the tibia, fibula, and femur aligned correctly to demonstrate anatomical correctness. Once this was completed, the next step was to add in the posterior cruciate ligament, anterior cruciate ligament, lateral collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament. This was the most difficult part because had to be formed and connected in the proper places. After constructing these ligaments, the meniscus and articular cartilage were inserted on the tibia and femur, respectively. The next step was to color code all surfaces corresponding to a particular anatomical feature, and finally selecting the best view to display on the brochure. This process took somewhere between 6 and 7 hours. The additional 3 to 4 hours were completed during the design of the brochure, the final product. Some of this time was in deciding what information to include. Eventually I decided to use the diagram to explain two operations, the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and a meniscectomy. The remaining time was spent organizing the content in the brochure and ensuring it was an aesthetically pleasing product. I

I came to create this product through my shadowing experiences. After learning the intricacies of these operations through my mentor it became clear to me that patients were not fully comprehending the operations that they were undergoing, especially for these two specific surgeries used in the independent project. During the project itself the learning process was primarily present in SketchUp. Although I had used the program before, it had been a while and there were tools that were necessary to relearn, as well as new tools that had to be learned for the first time to accurately create the model. The function of the innovation is to make it easier for patients of orthopedic surgeons and other orthopedic professionals to understand the operations being done on their knee. The problems addressed by this particular brochure compared to others currently present are that it simplifies medical terminologies and uses a simplistic three dimensional color coded model to depict the different anatomical features present within the knee. An example of using simplified medical terminology is referring to the tibia as the shin bone, and labeling it as such in the diagram. The model is more effective than others currently being used because the patella is removed for an interior view of the knee, and there is no overlapping of tissue which makes it difficult to distinguish between the different tissues present in the knee. There are currently many forms of orthopedic patient education available to patients, but nearly all of them suffer from the same two problems my brochure was intended to fix, confusing pictures and unknown medical terminologies. My product is of a greater simplicity than other products, but retains its effectiveness.

By | 2017-05-12T12:49:01+00:00 May 12th, 2017|Biomed Capstone Project 2017|0 Comments

About the Author:

Leave A Comment