Hunter Griffin – Independent Project

Hunter Griffin – Independent Project

Class of 2017

Introduction to Topic

For this project, I decided to shadow in the microbiology department at University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC). I turned my focus to the speed of bacterial identification, as it takes a couple of days to properly identify and unknown bacteria. I chose this route because microbiology is a field that I am currently interested in pursuing as a possible career option, as well as degree path in graduate school.

Project Description

With this project, my original goal was to create a new treatment or test for a bacterium. But, I soon learned that would not be possible in the time that I had to complete everything, as age constricted me. Within the span of this project, I learned many a new thing that I enjoyed seeing and hearing about. I also designed an app that I am actually proud of. No, I do not have an actual app to highlight, but I made a PowerPoint that fairly accurately describes the function of what the app would do. It took a lot of time to think about something that I could actually do for my innovation, and once I came up with something, I rolled with it. While the idea itself was not the most amazing initial brainstorm, I managed to mold it into something that is respectable enough to call a project.

Experience Description

My shadowing experience was an interesting one. It was an enjoyable time for me, but strictly because I learned so many new things. I had the pleasure of shadowing Dr. Christie Johnson, as well as her associates, while they worked on a big research project. One major downside of this shadowing experience that was immediately made apparent to me was that I was not allowed to touch anything such as bacteria and viruses, simply because I was not eighteen at the time. While this caused a huge damper on my ability to innovate anything (I was planning to make a bacterial treatment innovation), I still managed to come up with something. Each day, I would wake up and drive 45 minutes to the inner city, drive five to six floors up a parking garage, and finally walk over to the building. Once in the building, I would take the elevator to the fourth floor, and proceed to one of the two rooms that I shadow in. Once I get there, I get curious and ask how progress has come with the project. Much to my “surprise, every single day, it’s the same story: little progress has been made, and they are completing the same tasks as always. A major thing I did not like about shadowing was how mundane everything was. Over time, I slowly lost my sanity and started to hate everything about the place, so I drifted and played on my phone a bunch. But away from the negative, I liked what I learned. Being in a microbiology course currently, it was cool. I got to see people working with bacteria and viruses and fungi that I’ve never heard of before, as well as see how they run all their tests. All-in-all, it was a decent experience. Of course, finding an innovation was a tough thing to do, and I came up with many, MANY terrible ideas, I think one or two were decent enough to research. This is mainly because there really wasn’t any “shadowing” after the first two days happening. The first two days, I walked around with Dr. Johnson while she did her rounds, and saw some pretty cool things, and even saw things that could be improved. But of course, after those two days, I was never in that building again, so I could not expand off of previously thought of ideas. In the labs where I spent most of my time, it was really cut and dry: one person does one thing the entire day and nothing else. Again, making it even HARDER to get anything accomplished. I think the main reason I was so hesitant in finishing my work was due to sheer embarrassment of lack of substance. My “innovative idea” was not thought of until the last day of shadowing, and even than it was not a great idea, but at that point, I had nothing else, and no time left. After everything was said and done, I kind of wished I had shadowed my girlfriend’s dad at Real Life Prosthetics.

Innovation Description

The innovation that I ended up creating is what I call “Bacdentify’. Bacdentify is a bacterial identification database app that allows the user to take a picture of a bacterial culture, which is then run through a database. The app will use the same software techniques as Google Photos does in how it is able to identify specific characteristics of pictures, and group pictures based on similarities. With this, it will cross-reference the taken photo with multiple photos of every kind of known bacteria that has been cultured in the past. It compares the visual and physical aspects that are used when describing bacteria (such as color, height, ridges, and structure). Once it does so, it calculates the percent probability that it is a certain bacterium (based on number of physical matches and other bacteria with same matches), as well as recommend the tests that will best help confirm the identification. As of right now, there is nothing out in the world that could be labeled as a competitor for this app. The only thing close turned out to be fake, and the owner is worth nothing now. If I were to turn this concept into a full-fledged phone application, I would need to know how to, for starters, make an app. Right now, I am using a PowerPoint to demonstrate the app’s function.

+ Project Topic

Introduction to Topic

For this project, I decided to shadow in the microbiology department at University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC). I turned my focus to the speed of bacterial identification, as it takes a couple of days to properly identify and unknown bacteria. I chose this route because microbiology is a field that I am currently interested in pursuing as a possible career option, as well as degree path in graduate school.

+ Project Overview

Project Description

With this project, my original goal was to create a new treatment or test for a bacterium. But, I soon learned that would not be possible in the time that I had to complete everything, as age constricted me. Within the span of this project, I learned many a new thing that I enjoyed seeing and hearing about. I also designed an app that I am actually proud of. No, I do not have an actual app to highlight, but I made a PowerPoint that fairly accurately describes the function of what the app would do. It took a lot of time to think about something that I could actually do for my innovation, and once I came up with something, I rolled with it. While the idea itself was not the most amazing initial brainstorm, I managed to mold it into something that is respectable enough to call a project.

+ Experience

Experience Description

My shadowing experience was an interesting one. It was an enjoyable time for me, but strictly because I learned so many new things. I had the pleasure of shadowing Dr. Christie Johnson, as well as her associates, while they worked on a big research project. One major downside of this shadowing experience that was immediately made apparent to me was that I was not allowed to touch anything such as bacteria and viruses, simply because I was not eighteen at the time. While this caused a huge damper on my ability to innovate anything (I was planning to make a bacterial treatment innovation), I still managed to come up with something. Each day, I would wake up and drive 45 minutes to the inner city, drive five to six floors up a parking garage, and finally walk over to the building. Once in the building, I would take the elevator to the fourth floor, and proceed to one of the two rooms that I shadow in. Once I get there, I get curious and ask how progress has come with the project. Much to my “surprise, every single day, it’s the same story: little progress has been made, and they are completing the same tasks as always. A major thing I did not like about shadowing was how mundane everything was. Over time, I slowly lost my sanity and started to hate everything about the place, so I drifted and played on my phone a bunch. But away from the negative, I liked what I learned. Being in a microbiology course currently, it was cool. I got to see people working with bacteria and viruses and fungi that I’ve never heard of before, as well as see how they run all their tests. All-in-all, it was a decent experience. Of course, finding an innovation was a tough thing to do, and I came up with many, MANY terrible ideas, I think one or two were decent enough to research. This is mainly because there really wasn’t any “shadowing” after the first two days happening. The first two days, I walked around with Dr. Johnson while she did her rounds, and saw some pretty cool things, and even saw things that could be improved. But of course, after those two days, I was never in that building again, so I could not expand off of previously thought of ideas. In the labs where I spent most of my time, it was really cut and dry: one person does one thing the entire day and nothing else. Again, making it even HARDER to get anything accomplished. I think the main reason I was so hesitant in finishing my work was due to sheer embarrassment of lack of substance. My “innovative idea” was not thought of until the last day of shadowing, and even than it was not a great idea, but at that point, I had nothing else, and no time left. After everything was said and done, I kind of wished I had shadowed my girlfriend’s dad at Real Life Prosthetics.

+ Innovation

Innovation Description

The innovation that I ended up creating is what I call “Bacdentify’. Bacdentify is a bacterial identification database app that allows the user to take a picture of a bacterial culture, which is then run through a database. The app will use the same software techniques as Google Photos does in how it is able to identify specific characteristics of pictures, and group pictures based on similarities. With this, it will cross-reference the taken photo with multiple photos of every kind of known bacteria that has been cultured in the past. It compares the visual and physical aspects that are used when describing bacteria (such as color, height, ridges, and structure). Once it does so, it calculates the percent probability that it is a certain bacterium (based on number of physical matches and other bacteria with same matches), as well as recommend the tests that will best help confirm the identification. As of right now, there is nothing out in the world that could be labeled as a competitor for this app. The only thing close turned out to be fake, and the owner is worth nothing now. If I were to turn this concept into a full-fledged phone application, I would need to know how to, for starters, make an app. Right now, I am using a PowerPoint to demonstrate the app’s function.

By | 2017-05-24T19:49:18+00:00 May 24th, 2017|Biomed Capstone Project 2017|0 Comments

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