Jonathan Scott – Independent Project

Jonathan Scott – Independent Project

Class of 2017

Introduction to Topic

For my project, I would like to change the organizational method for physical therapy facilities around the world. Anyone who has broken bones, sprained joints, pulled muscles, or any general pain has physical therapy recommended to them. There are thousands of physical therapy facilities and all of them could become more advanced. I want to help them do so by creating a more efficient means of organizing patient information. I chose to work on this topic for my project because I myself have been in a situation where a physical therapist was disorganized when dealing with my own patient information.

Project Description

Throughout my shadowing experience, I learned a lot of valuable information. While at the MedStar Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation facility, I met and dealt with many patients with all kinds of injuries. In each of my journals, I discussed a different patient that I had previously met and worked with. Each patient had a different injury and a different cause for coming to physical therapy. When beginning to think of my innovation, I wanted to come up with something that would actually prove to be beneficial in society. I began to think of possible machines or devices I could invent that would in some way speed up the therapy process for a certain type of injury. Suddenly I remembered that a common problem I saw while doing my shadowing was the lack of organization throughout the facility. I decided this was what I was going to focus my innovation around. I talked to Steve Luca about the idea and he said that a better system for patient tracking would be extremely helpful to him and his patients. (Luca, S. (2017). Innovation Talk [Personal interview]).

Experience Description

I have learned a lot from shadowing Steve Luca at the Medstar Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation facility (Luca, S. (2017). Innovation Talk [Personal interview]). Although at times my time spent there was dreadful due to the lack of action, I did gain valuable knowledge. One of the first things I was taught was which heat and ice packs to make for different types of injuries. For example, someone with a neck injury would use a cervical heat pack, which is triangular, as opposed to someone who has a thigh injury who would need a sandwich heating pack with a rectangular shape. Once I knew which heat and ice packs were used for which patients, Steve explained to me the difference between different types of electronic stimulation.

After learning the basic knowledge of what physical therapists do, I began actually interacting with patients. The patient I can most recall was a girl who had a broken ankle. She had already gone through surgery on her ankle and she was beginning her rehabilitation. She walked around with a boot and on crutches. The second time that I saw this girl, the physical therapy assistant who was assigned to her, could not find her patient chart. Each patient chart has a list of what that patient has done each day that they have come in to the office. This helps the physical therapists keep track of the patient’s progress. Once the assistants gave up looking for her chart, they just based what the patient would do on that day on what they think they remember her doing last time. It is very likely that these assistants did not remember everything she did throughout her last visit. Although this might not seem like a big deal, having an accurate record of which patients have done what is important to their care. Without an accurate record of what a patient has done, the rehabilitation process becomes less efficient.

Another interesting observation I made was in regards to a teenage athlete who had been recovering from a torn ACL. He was decently far in his rehabilitation process and his paperwork consisted of 3 pages. When he came in the first time I had seen him, the facility had lost his most recent patient file. Since they had the other two papers, they started where the second sheet left off, repeating the exercises he had likely done the past few times he had came. This slowed down his recovery speed by setting his physical therapy back two to three weeks. Seeing multiple patient files being lost spiked my interest. At this point in my experience, I knew that my project would be based on a new organizational system.  

Innovation Description

My innovation if applied to physical therapy facilities will solve all issues involving the loss of patient files. I have learned that the use of these files is extremely important to the efficient rehabilitation of all patients. I came up with a functional app that lets patients and their physical therapists see a list of the physical therapists in a certain office, and all of their patients. Using a Socrative like login, users can sign into a “room” that allows them to do so (“Socrative”, 2017). From there, clicking on a certain physical therapist will present a list of patients. Once the user clicks on a specific patient, their patient files that list what they have done on every day they have gone to physical therapy will be accessible. Physical therapists login will allow them to use technology that is similar to Microsoft Excel to edit and update patient data charts (Microsoft Excel for Mac 2011, 2017). One of my key focuses was to make the app simple and easy to follow. There are four main parts to my app. Each section is essential to the functionality of the app.

The name of the app is “PT Orchestrate.” On the apps home screen, there is a greeting in the top left corner that reads “Welcome.” In the center of the app is the company logo. Below the logo there are three access tabs. The first tab reads “Physical therapists.” Once a user has signed in and clicked on the physical therapists button, the app will take them to a screen that has multiple functions. The screen will have a list of each head physical therapist with each of their assistant’s names underneath of them. I included the assistant’s names in case a patient only remembers the assistants name and is unsure of whom to click on. In addition to the therapists, there is also a question mark button next to each head therapist. When clicked on, the screen will take the user to a profile page of that therapist. Each therapist is required to create a profile that has a paragraph biography, and contact information such as their email, phone number, and mobile phone if they wish to put it. Once a physical therapist has been selected, a list of all of their patients will come up. After picking a patient, this is where the user will see the patients file with a record of their physical therapy history.

The second section of my app takes us back to the home screen. The tab below “Physical Therapists” is labeled “Account.” When clicked on, the users name will appear in the top left corner. Below that there will be a list of each physical therapy facility you are logged into, the names of your head physical therapists, and the names of your physical therapy assistants. The third and final tab of the main screen is titled “Settings.” Within the settings there are many functions. There are “Security”, “Log Out”, and “Help” tabs. The security tab gives you the option to “Change Password”, “Change E-mail”, “Change Security Questions”, and “Delete Account.” Each of these options asks you to confirm that you would like to do so before actually completing the task. Once confirming, the app will take you to a screen that either says “Password Changed”, “E-Mail Changed”, “Security Questions Changed”, or “Account Deleted.” Clicking the Log Out tab will require you to confirm that you would like to do so just as the other tabs would. The Help button takes the user to the URL of the PT Orchestrate. Although I did not create a website for my innovation, I included a fake URL for functionality purposes.

The fourth main part of my app deals with the back and home buttons conveniently placed throughout the program. On each page of the app, the user will find a button at the bottom or top corners that done of two things. The button either takes them directly back to the last page they were on, or it takes them back to the home screen. The home screen buttons have a house shape on them while the back buttons have a return arrow.

When deciding on what colors to use for my app, I wanted to have a theme that symbolized success and growth. Orange, one of the two main colors of my app, is said to represent success, determination, joy, and creativity. Green, the other main color of the app represents nature, growth, freshness, and safety (“Color Wheel Pro: Color Meaning”, 2017). These are the feelings I would like to evoke from the apps users.

For my project I did eighty hours of experience, leaving me to do ten hours of work on my innovation. I took four hours to complete the first tab of my app. I had to add the fake names of each therapist, physical therapist and patients to different slides, add the therapist profile pages, and make sure that each button was hyperlinked to the correct slides. In addition to this, I came up with fictional injuries for each patient and created patient data charts with actual exercises and dates for each separate injury. The second tab along with going back and changing each button and page to the correct color scheme took me about an hour. The second “Account” button only took me about twenty minutes due to the creation of the page and listing the physical therapists and their assistants along with the facility name. The color scheme took me about forty minutes. It was very simple to complete, however, going back and changing every color took time. The “Settings” tab took me another four hours to complete. Although it was fairly simplistic, I went into extreme detail in order to make sure that the app seemed realistic. This section alone has thirteen slides that all hyperlink back to specific pages.  It deals with the option to have “Security”, “Log Out”, get “Help”, “Change Password”, “Change E-mail”, “Change Security Questions”, and “Delete Account.” Each of these tabs requires multiple other pages. This was tedious work. Finally, the last hour I spent inserting home and return buttons. On each page of the app, the user will find a button at the bottom or top corners that done of two things. The button either takes them directly back to the last page they were on, or it takes them back to the home screen.

The closest technological competitor for a physical therapy organizational system would be Microsoft Excel. Excel allows the therapists to insert their patient data very easily, however, it would become a hassle to share their data files with their patients themselves (Microsoft Excel For Mac 2011, 2017). My app would beat out Excel in this field due to its ability to allow patients easy access to their own files. The only materials I used to complete my app were Microsoft PowerPoint (Microsoft Powerpoint For Mac 2011, 2017) and Google Images (Empty Profile Picture,, 2017). The only legal concerns that would relate to my app would be patient security and HIPAA. When dealing with patient security, I would need to make sure that my app was well secured using firewalls and encryptions. HIPAA is United States legislation that states that anything relating to medical information must provide data privacy and security provisions safeguarding said information (“What is HIPAA”, 2017).

Project Topic

Introduction to Topic

For my project, I would like to change the organizational method for physical therapy facilities around the world. Anyone who has broken bones, sprained joints, pulled muscles, or any general pain has physical therapy recommended to them. There are thousands of physical therapy facilities and all of them could become more advanced. I want to help them do so by creating a more efficient means of organizing patient information. I chose to work on this topic for my project because I myself have been in a situation where a physical therapist was disorganized when dealing with my own patient information.

Project Overview

Project Description

Throughout my shadowing experience, I learned a lot of valuable information. While at the MedStar Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation facility, I met and dealt with many patients with all kinds of injuries. In each of my journals, I discussed a different patient that I had previously met and worked with. Each patient had a different injury and a different cause for coming to physical therapy. When beginning to think of my innovation, I wanted to come up with something that would actually prove to be beneficial in society. I began to think of possible machines or devices I could invent that would in some way speed up the therapy process for a certain type of injury. Suddenly I remembered that a common problem I saw while doing my shadowing was the lack of organization throughout the facility. I decided this was what I was going to focus my innovation around. I talked to Steve Luca about the idea and he said that a better system for patient tracking would be extremely helpful to him and his patients. (Luca, S. (2017). Innovation Talk [Personal interview]).

Experience

Experience Description

I have learned a lot from shadowing Steve Luca at the Medstar Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation facility (Luca, S. (2017). Innovation Talk [Personal interview]). Although at times my time spent there was dreadful due to the lack of action, I did gain valuable knowledge. One of the first things I was taught was which heat and ice packs to make for different types of injuries. For example, someone with a neck injury would use a cervical heat pack, which is triangular, as opposed to someone who has a thigh injury who would need a sandwich heating pack with a rectangular shape. Once I knew which heat and ice packs were used for which patients, Steve explained to me the difference between different types of electronic stimulation.

After learning the basic knowledge of what physical therapists do, I began actually interacting with patients. The patient I can most recall was a girl who had a broken ankle. She had already gone through surgery on her ankle and she was beginning her rehabilitation. She walked around with a boot and on crutches. The second time that I saw this girl, the physical therapy assistant who was assigned to her, could not find her patient chart. Each patient chart has a list of what that patient has done each day that they have come in to the office. This helps the physical therapists keep track of the patient’s progress. Once the assistants gave up looking for her chart, they just based what the patient would do on that day on what they think they remember her doing last time. It is very likely that these assistants did not remember everything she did throughout her last visit. Although this might not seem like a big deal, having an accurate record of which patients have done what is important to their care. Without an accurate record of what a patient has done, the rehabilitation process becomes less efficient.

Another interesting observation I made was in regards to a teenage athlete who had been recovering from a torn ACL. He was decently far in his rehabilitation process and his paperwork consisted of 3 pages. When he came in the first time I had seen him, the facility had lost his most recent patient file. Since they had the other two papers, they started where the second sheet left off, repeating the exercises he had likely done the past few times he had came. This slowed down his recovery speed by setting his physical therapy back two to three weeks. Seeing multiple patient files being lost spiked my interest. At this point in my experience, I knew that my project would be based on a new organizational system.  

Innovation

Innovation Description

My innovation if applied to physical therapy facilities will solve all issues involving the loss of patient files. I have learned that the use of these files is extremely important to the efficient rehabilitation of all patients. I came up with a functional app that lets patients and their physical therapists see a list of the physical therapists in a certain office, and all of their patients. Using a Socrative like login, users can sign into a “room” that allows them to do so (“Socrative”, 2017). From there, clicking on a certain physical therapist will present a list of patients. Once the user clicks on a specific patient, their patient files that list what they have done on every day they have gone to physical therapy will be accessible. Physical therapists login will allow them to use technology that is similar to Microsoft Excel to edit and update patient data charts (Microsoft Excel for Mac 2011, 2017). One of my key focuses was to make the app simple and easy to follow. There are four main parts to my app. Each section is essential to the functionality of the app.

The name of the app is “PT Orchestrate.” On the apps home screen, there is a greeting in the top left corner that reads “Welcome.” In the center of the app is the company logo. Below the logo there are three access tabs. The first tab reads “Physical therapists.” Once a user has signed in and clicked on the physical therapists button, the app will take them to a screen that has multiple functions. The screen will have a list of each head physical therapist with each of their assistant’s names underneath of them. I included the assistant’s names in case a patient only remembers the assistants name and is unsure of whom to click on. In addition to the therapists, there is also a question mark button next to each head therapist. When clicked on, the screen will take the user to a profile page of that therapist. Each therapist is required to create a profile that has a paragraph biography, and contact information such as their email, phone number, and mobile phone if they wish to put it. Once a physical therapist has been selected, a list of all of their patients will come up. After picking a patient, this is where the user will see the patients file with a record of their physical therapy history.

The second section of my app takes us back to the home screen. The tab below “Physical Therapists” is labeled “Account.” When clicked on, the users name will appear in the top left corner. Below that there will be a list of each physical therapy facility you are logged into, the names of your head physical therapists, and the names of your physical therapy assistants. The third and final tab of the main screen is titled “Settings.” Within the settings there are many functions. There are “Security”, “Log Out”, and “Help” tabs. The security tab gives you the option to “Change Password”, “Change E-mail”, “Change Security Questions”, and “Delete Account.” Each of these options asks you to confirm that you would like to do so before actually completing the task. Once confirming, the app will take you to a screen that either says “Password Changed”, “E-Mail Changed”, “Security Questions Changed”, or “Account Deleted.” Clicking the Log Out tab will require you to confirm that you would like to do so just as the other tabs would. The Help button takes the user to the URL of the PT Orchestrate. Although I did not create a website for my innovation, I included a fake URL for functionality purposes.

The fourth main part of my app deals with the back and home buttons conveniently placed throughout the program. On each page of the app, the user will find a button at the bottom or top corners that done of two things. The button either takes them directly back to the last page they were on, or it takes them back to the home screen. The home screen buttons have a house shape on them while the back buttons have a return arrow.

When deciding on what colors to use for my app, I wanted to have a theme that symbolized success and growth. Orange, one of the two main colors of my app, is said to represent success, determination, joy, and creativity. Green, the other main color of the app represents nature, growth, freshness, and safety (“Color Wheel Pro: Color Meaning”, 2017). These are the feelings I would like to evoke from the apps users.

For my project I did eighty hours of experience, leaving me to do ten hours of work on my innovation. I took four hours to complete the first tab of my app. I had to add the fake names of each therapist, physical therapist and patients to different slides, add the therapist profile pages, and make sure that each button was hyperlinked to the correct slides. In addition to this, I came up with fictional injuries for each patient and created patient data charts with actual exercises and dates for each separate injury. The second tab along with going back and changing each button and page to the correct color scheme took me about an hour. The second “Account” button only took me about twenty minutes due to the creation of the page and listing the physical therapists and their assistants along with the facility name. The color scheme took me about forty minutes. It was very simple to complete, however, going back and changing every color took time. The “Settings” tab took me another four hours to complete. Although it was fairly simplistic, I went into extreme detail in order to make sure that the app seemed realistic. This section alone has thirteen slides that all hyperlink back to specific pages.  It deals with the option to have “Security”, “Log Out”, get “Help”, “Change Password”, “Change E-mail”, “Change Security Questions”, and “Delete Account.” Each of these tabs requires multiple other pages. This was tedious work. Finally, the last hour I spent inserting home and return buttons. On each page of the app, the user will find a button at the bottom or top corners that done of two things. The button either takes them directly back to the last page they were on, or it takes them back to the home screen.

The closest technological competitor for a physical therapy organizational system would be Microsoft Excel. Excel allows the therapists to insert their patient data very easily, however, it would become a hassle to share their data files with their patients themselves (Microsoft Excel For Mac 2011, 2017). My app would beat out Excel in this field due to its ability to allow patients easy access to their own files. The only materials I used to complete my app were Microsoft PowerPoint (Microsoft Powerpoint For Mac 2011, 2017) and Google Images (Empty Profile Picture,, 2017). The only legal concerns that would relate to my app would be patient security and HIPAA. When dealing with patient security, I would need to make sure that my app was well secured using firewalls and encryptions. HIPAA is United States legislation that states that anything relating to medical information must provide data privacy and security provisions safeguarding said information (“What is HIPAA”, 2017).

By | 2017-05-12T04:04:57+00:00 May 12th, 2017|Biomed Capstone Project 2017|0 Comments

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