Miranda Bengel – Independent Project

Miranda Bengel – Independent Project

Class of 2017

Introduction to Topic

Animals are treated and taken care of in many different situations. Some animals appear on the Sarah McLaughlin TV commercials living in shelters around the world run by volunteers. Some animals have owners that take them to veterinarian clinic for checkups and visits making sure to keep the animals healthy. And some animals experience tragic situations that cause them to be rushed to the ER. In all of these situations, humans are needed to help the animals live which, most times, is a stressfully engaging situation.

Project Description

I shadowed for 26 hours with Doctor Gibson at the Rock Spring Veterinary Clinic by creating print media (through canva and adobe spark) for 15 hours. While I was working with Doctor Gibson I learned from an interview with her that many people do not understand why animals need so many vaccines and what they protect against. My innovation informs owners about certain vaccines and how they can protect their animal. It also keeps owners interested in going to the vet regularly.

Then, I volunteered for 26 hours at Luna’s House by creating a flowchart on aggressive animals and how to treat them for 10 hours and print media (through canva and adobe spark) for 5 hours. I learned that animals get put into shelters after developing aggression issues and sometimes they even develop the issues inside the shelter. The flowchart helps owners identify the aggression and hopefully treat it before it gets out of control while the print media informs the community about helping shelter animals.

Finally, I shadowed for 8 hours with Doctor Allison at the Emergency Animal Hospital by creating a flowchart describing when it is appropriate to take an animal to the hospital for 10 hours. I saw that many animals go to the hospital for reasons that are not actually emergencies which inhibits other animals from getting the treatment they need. This flowchart informs owners when they actually need to take their animal to the hospital and when they can wait to take them to their normal veterinarian.

Experience Description

While I shadowed at Rock Spring Vet, I mostly got to see appointments with dogs which is just annual checkups. I also got to see lots of vaccines being given and blood drawn. I did learned how they tested the blood that they get from each patient to test for different types of possible diseases inside of the animal. The cooler things I got to see were a urinalysis where the Doctor obtained the urine straight from the cat’s bladder by squeezing the bladder towards the skin, sticking a needle into it, and draw it out before testing it. The Doctor told me that this gets rid of any chance for rouge bacteria to get into the sample, it is the most sterile way. Another cool thing I got to see was an autopsy being done on a dead cat. One of the technicians had to identify the different organs inside the cat while she was dissecting it. I really enjoyed my time with Rock Spring because it gave me so many chances to learn new things medically like how to test an animal’s blood and such. Everyone in the clinic was so accepting and willing to teach me their knowledge whether it was on how to file patient files or how to analyze a urinalysis. From this experience I learned that I did not want to become a veterinarian or any type of animal technician.

As I volunteered at Luna’s House I did not learn much, we only had to feed the animals and play with them and take them on walks. But the main thing that I did learn was how to handle aggressive animals. Two of the dogs that I helped take care of had aggression. One would try to bite if you put anything under her neck or stomach while the other one was like dynamite and could explode any minute if you looked at him the wrong way. The dynamite dog even had some muzzle training that tried to teach him to be calm while the muzzle was being put on through the use of treats and good praise. While I enjoyed volunteering with the dogs, I would rather be with the cats or small animals where there was less a risk of getting hurt. The other volunteers would tell us stories about getting bitten by the dogs, and that is not something that I wanted. The good thing is that I learned how to handle aggressive behavior in dogs so that if I ever had my own dog that was aggressive I could handle it.  I love working with all animals and could certainly see myself continuing volunteering in the future, just maybe with a bit of a less aggressive animal.

The emergency hospital was a crazy place to shadow for one day. While I saw some stuff that I already knew how to do like the blood analysis for dogs, I learned some new things like how to insert an IV drips in a dog’s vein and I even got to watch a surgery on a dog. The IV drip was interesting to watch because the technician had to disinfect the area before cutting back the hair and disinfect it again. The she just stuck the needle into the dogs vein (it was a large dog so it had a large vein) and as she did so, the vein started pumping out blood. While it seemed to be messy, the dog was in no visible pain and it was an enriching experience to watch. It sure seems easier to put an IV in on a dog than a human. I also got to watch a dog go into surgery because the incision she had put in while she was spayed broke and her stomach lining was coming out of her abdomen. The surgery was okay, it did not smell as bad as I thought it would and the Doctor cut away a lot more tissue than I thought she would. I guess I thought that she would just stuff the lining back inside and sew the dog up but since it was not clean and could lead to infection, she cut it off. I think the coolest part about the surgery was when the Doctor sewed the dog up, I knew what kind of sutures she was doing both inside the abdomen, outside the abdomen and as she stapled the dog shut. Now I know that I will NEVER go into emergency animal care because I certainly could not deal with the amount of euthanizations they get each week and they probably see some pretty traumatic things happen to animals. I love animals too much to see them come into the hospital dying and possibly lose them.

Overall, all of the experiences I had really taught me how the professionals care for animals and how owners and people should care for their animals if they have one or even if they don’t.

Innovation Description

Since I shadowed for 60 hours, I made 40 hours worth of innovations spread across all three places that I worked with. For my time at Rock Spring Veterinary Clinic, I learned that many owners do not understand why their pets need vaccines, how they are caused, or how their pets or even themselves could be harmed by the disease. Due to the lack of communication between veterinarians and pet owners, I decided to make various forms of print media in an attempt to better connect the veterinarians with pet owners to keep them more in the loop of what is going on. The print media and adobe spark accounts for innovation hours.

The first print media that I made was on different vaccines that could spark owner interest to ask their veterinarians to explain the risks and reasons to get vaccinated. In order to make these print media flyers, I used both the canva app and the adobe spark app to create high quality and interesting prints. I acquired the pictures off of both the canva app and off of the website unsplash. Some pictures are specific to Maryland by saying how many dogs get Lyme disease in Maryland each year in an attempt to get more local owners to see how their pets can be affected. There were also specific print medias for cats versus dogs because certain animals are affected by certain diseases that the other may not be. Many websites tend to have statistics for vaccines but there are also many websites out there that urge owners to not get their pets vaccinated because it could lead to certain health problems which is not true. Something that veterinary clinics could also do is information sessions on vaccines for their pets so I made a flyer that could be sent out to pet owners encouraging them to come listen to the doctors talk about the different vaccines that that clinic offers and encourages for animals.

In addition to the print media flyers, I also made some postcards for the veterinarians that would help send out to the owners as a reminder for their next appointment, how to help an animal that has anxiety about coming to the vet, if an owner gets a new animal, cat or dog, to come for a new appointment, and if an owner has more than one pet that is not seen by the same doctor or any doctor. They are basically just reminder cards for owners. This idea came from the postcards that the dentist and pediatricians send out to remind you of your yearly appointments and when to call and schedule them. If pet owners forget to schedule their next appointment while in the office then the receptionists would have to call the owners but instead, they could just send out these postcards and it could use less time. From my research, there are not any types of postcards used for veterinary purposes.

Each print started with a template from canva or adobe spark that I then put pictures and backgrounds into and on top of that statistics and wording. After each design was made, I checked them again to make sure all spelling errors could be fixed and also to make sure that the information made sense. The formatting for the pictures were looked at next to make sure that there was no white space that was unused and to double check that the pictures were high quality. After checking all of the print media myself, I asked a fellow classmate if they could check over my work. The feedback from my classmate was that all of the prints looked high quality and did not need any improvement. I have reached out to the clinic that I shadowed at but so far, the doctor has not gotten back to me.

Next, I volunteered at Luna’s House which is a volunteer run animal shelter. With my time there, I volunteered with the dogs. I learned that the dogs tended to develop aggression while in the shelter due to the living conditions and anxiety they were put under, as stated earlier in the introduction. After further research and asking some more of the volunteers, I also learned that cats in the shelter tended to develop some types of aggression if kept there long enough. Aggression in animals does not just start in shelters but it can start through owner’s behavior and because of that, aggressive animals get put back into the shelter.

In an attempt to keep aggressive animals out of the shelters, I made two flowcharts; one on how to pinpoint and treat aggressive dogs, and one on how to pinpoint and treat aggressive cats based on what the ASPCA says. The flowcharts account for 10 hours of innovation. The flowchart should help educate owners about what type of aggression their animal has and how to treat it by going to certain medical professionals. While they aren’t any flowcharts out currently, there are different websites that provide the same information on aggressive animals. My first draft of both flowcharts were just rough drafts until I went back through and color coded them to make them easier to understand and read. The intent behind the flowcharts is to keep aggressive animals out of the shelters and to teach aggressive animals in the shelters how to be less aggressive.

I also made print media flyers for the animals in the shelters using adobe spark and canva. The print media flyers account for 5 hours of innovation. There are so many animals every year that get put into shelters just because they are overpopulated. As stated in the introduction, a strong community that is aware of the animal shelters can spark more volunteers and less overpopulation. In Harford County, we seem to be lacking that type of community that is aware of the animal shelter problems we are facing. The different flyers have statistics on them describing how many cats and dogs get put into shelters each year in an attempt to show how the animals are being affected yearly. They also go onto say how many of those shelter animals get euthanized each year not only in the world, but in Maryland too. In addition to the shelter statistics, there are also some behavioral flyers about cats and dogs pointing out different behaviors that would cause owners to want to see a medical professional about treating their animals. The last flyer is one created to play with the pathos of humans, saying that we do not live outside so why should animals, in an attempt to keep animals off the streets and at least some place safe like a shelter. It even goes to encourage people to adopt animals from the shelters. This innovation involves the community which encourages and educates the general population on how to care for any animal they see giving them a reason to care and a reason to help.

The last place that I shadowed at was the Emergency Animal Hospital where I watched many animals come into the hospital without a real reason to be there. The doctor I shadowed there told me that many animals came into the hospital without a true medical issue because many owners do not know what is truly counted as an emergency. That is when I came up with the idea of another flowchart that could be used to inform pet owners of real emergencies when it comes to their pet. This flowchart would count for 5 hours of innovation. The flowchart starts with the greatest type of emergency before slowly decreasing until the issue is not counted as an emergency. The first draft was very crowded and somewhat confusing so the final draft which was color coded and more stream-lined seemed to get rid of that confusion. The relation here from what I learned is that the emergency hospital should only be used for emergencies when people aren’t meaning that informing the public of pet owners of the real types of pet emergencies can keep the emergency hospital for emergencies.

Based on all of the places that I shadowed and volunteered at, I did some research on other national pet days that people should be aware of. The last thing I put time into would be print media flyers created through canva and adobe spark. The print media would count for 5 hours of innovation. These print media’s are different than before, they include the dates of different pet health awareness days, and different shelter adoption months. If there are certain days and months in the year that can remind pet owners to get vaccines or to get dental cleanings or such then it would be very beneficial to let the community know. While they do make calendars that can inform pet owners about these days, having them in flyer versions make them easier to pick up and see at the vet or the shelter or animal hospital all just to help out your pet.

Project Topic

Introduction to Topic

Animals are treated and taken care of in many different situations. Some animals appear on the Sarah McLaughlin TV commercials living in shelters around the world run by volunteers. Some animals have owners that take them to veterinarian clinic for checkups and visits making sure to keep the animals healthy. And some animals experience tragic situations that cause them to be rushed to the ER. In all of these situations, humans are needed to help the animals live which, most times, is a stressfully engaging situation.

Project Overview

Project Description

I shadowed for 26 hours with Doctor Gibson at the Rock Spring Veterinary Clinic by creating print media (through canva and adobe spark) for 15 hours. While I was working with Doctor Gibson I learned from an interview with her that many people do not understand why animals need so many vaccines and what they protect against. My innovation informs owners about certain vaccines and how they can protect their animal. It also keeps owners interested in going to the vet regularly.

Then, I volunteered for 26 hours at Luna’s House by creating a flowchart on aggressive animals and how to treat them for 10 hours and print media (through canva and adobe spark) for 5 hours. I learned that animals get put into shelters after developing aggression issues and sometimes they even develop the issues inside the shelter. The flowchart helps owners identify the aggression and hopefully treat it before it gets out of control while the print media informs the community about helping shelter animals.

Finally, I shadowed for 8 hours with Doctor Allison at the Emergency Animal Hospital by creating a flowchart describing when it is appropriate to take an animal to the hospital for 10 hours. I saw that many animals go to the hospital for reasons that are not actually emergencies which inhibits other animals from getting the treatment they need. This flowchart informs owners when they actually need to take their animal to the hospital and when they can wait to take them to their normal veterinarian.

Experience

Experience Description

While I shadowed at Rock Spring Vet, I mostly got to see appointments with dogs which is just annual checkups. I also got to see lots of vaccines being given and blood drawn. I did learned how they tested the blood that they get from each patient to test for different types of possible diseases inside of the animal. The cooler things I got to see were a urinalysis where the Doctor obtained the urine straight from the cat’s bladder by squeezing the bladder towards the skin, sticking a needle into it, and draw it out before testing it. The Doctor told me that this gets rid of any chance for rouge bacteria to get into the sample, it is the most sterile way. Another cool thing I got to see was an autopsy being done on a dead cat. One of the technicians had to identify the different organs inside the cat while she was dissecting it. I really enjoyed my time with Rock Spring because it gave me so many chances to learn new things medically like how to test an animal’s blood and such. Everyone in the clinic was so accepting and willing to teach me their knowledge whether it was on how to file patient files or how to analyze a urinalysis. From this experience I learned that I did not want to become a veterinarian or any type of animal technician.

As I volunteered at Luna’s House I did not learn much, we only had to feed the animals and play with them and take them on walks. But the main thing that I did learn was how to handle aggressive animals. Two of the dogs that I helped take care of had aggression. One would try to bite if you put anything under her neck or stomach while the other one was like dynamite and could explode any minute if you looked at him the wrong way. The dynamite dog even had some muzzle training that tried to teach him to be calm while the muzzle was being put on through the use of treats and good praise. While I enjoyed volunteering with the dogs, I would rather be with the cats or small animals where there was less a risk of getting hurt. The other volunteers would tell us stories about getting bitten by the dogs, and that is not something that I wanted. The good thing is that I learned how to handle aggressive behavior in dogs so that if I ever had my own dog that was aggressive I could handle it.  I love working with all animals and could certainly see myself continuing volunteering in the future, just maybe with a bit of a less aggressive animal.

The emergency hospital was a crazy place to shadow for one day. While I saw some stuff that I already knew how to do like the blood analysis for dogs, I learned some new things like how to insert an IV drips in a dog’s vein and I even got to watch a surgery on a dog. The IV drip was interesting to watch because the technician had to disinfect the area before cutting back the hair and disinfect it again. The she just stuck the needle into the dogs vein (it was a large dog so it had a large vein) and as she did so, the vein started pumping out blood. While it seemed to be messy, the dog was in no visible pain and it was an enriching experience to watch. It sure seems easier to put an IV in on a dog than a human. I also got to watch a dog go into surgery because the incision she had put in while she was spayed broke and her stomach lining was coming out of her abdomen. The surgery was okay, it did not smell as bad as I thought it would and the Doctor cut away a lot more tissue than I thought she would. I guess I thought that she would just stuff the lining back inside and sew the dog up but since it was not clean and could lead to infection, she cut it off. I think the coolest part about the surgery was when the Doctor sewed the dog up, I knew what kind of sutures she was doing both inside the abdomen, outside the abdomen and as she stapled the dog shut. Now I know that I will NEVER go into emergency animal care because I certainly could not deal with the amount of euthanizations they get each week and they probably see some pretty traumatic things happen to animals. I love animals too much to see them come into the hospital dying and possibly lose them.

Overall, all of the experiences I had really taught me how the professionals care for animals and how owners and people should care for their animals if they have one or even if they don’t.

Innovation

Innovation Description

Since I shadowed for 60 hours, I made 40 hours worth of innovations spread across all three places that I worked with. For my time at Rock Spring Veterinary Clinic, I learned that many owners do not understand why their pets need vaccines, how they are caused, or how their pets or even themselves could be harmed by the disease. Due to the lack of communication between veterinarians and pet owners, I decided to make various forms of print media in an attempt to better connect the veterinarians with pet owners to keep them more in the loop of what is going on. The print media and adobe spark accounts for innovation hours.

The first print media that I made was on different vaccines that could spark owner interest to ask their veterinarians to explain the risks and reasons to get vaccinated. In order to make these print media flyers, I used both the canva app and the adobe spark app to create high quality and interesting prints. I acquired the pictures off of both the canva app and off of the website unsplash. Some pictures are specific to Maryland by saying how many dogs get Lyme disease in Maryland each year in an attempt to get more local owners to see how their pets can be affected. There were also specific print medias for cats versus dogs because certain animals are affected by certain diseases that the other may not be. Many websites tend to have statistics for vaccines but there are also many websites out there that urge owners to not get their pets vaccinated because it could lead to certain health problems which is not true. Something that veterinary clinics could also do is information sessions on vaccines for their pets so I made a flyer that could be sent out to pet owners encouraging them to come listen to the doctors talk about the different vaccines that that clinic offers and encourages for animals.

In addition to the print media flyers, I also made some postcards for the veterinarians that would help send out to the owners as a reminder for their next appointment, how to help an animal that has anxiety about coming to the vet, if an owner gets a new animal, cat or dog, to come for a new appointment, and if an owner has more than one pet that is not seen by the same doctor or any doctor. They are basically just reminder cards for owners. This idea came from the postcards that the dentist and pediatricians send out to remind you of your yearly appointments and when to call and schedule them. If pet owners forget to schedule their next appointment while in the office then the receptionists would have to call the owners but instead, they could just send out these postcards and it could use less time. From my research, there are not any types of postcards used for veterinary purposes.

Each print started with a template from canva or adobe spark that I then put pictures and backgrounds into and on top of that statistics and wording. After each design was made, I checked them again to make sure all spelling errors could be fixed and also to make sure that the information made sense. The formatting for the pictures were looked at next to make sure that there was no white space that was unused and to double check that the pictures were high quality. After checking all of the print media myself, I asked a fellow classmate if they could check over my work. The feedback from my classmate was that all of the prints looked high quality and did not need any improvement. I have reached out to the clinic that I shadowed at but so far, the doctor has not gotten back to me.

Next, I volunteered at Luna’s House which is a volunteer run animal shelter. With my time there, I volunteered with the dogs. I learned that the dogs tended to develop aggression while in the shelter due to the living conditions and anxiety they were put under, as stated earlier in the introduction. After further research and asking some more of the volunteers, I also learned that cats in the shelter tended to develop some types of aggression if kept there long enough. Aggression in animals does not just start in shelters but it can start through owner’s behavior and because of that, aggressive animals get put back into the shelter.

In an attempt to keep aggressive animals out of the shelters, I made two flowcharts; one on how to pinpoint and treat aggressive dogs, and one on how to pinpoint and treat aggressive cats based on what the ASPCA says. The flowcharts account for 10 hours of innovation. The flowchart should help educate owners about what type of aggression their animal has and how to treat it by going to certain medical professionals. While they aren’t any flowcharts out currently, there are different websites that provide the same information on aggressive animals. My first draft of both flowcharts were just rough drafts until I went back through and color coded them to make them easier to understand and read. The intent behind the flowcharts is to keep aggressive animals out of the shelters and to teach aggressive animals in the shelters how to be less aggressive.

I also made print media flyers for the animals in the shelters using adobe spark and canva. The print media flyers account for 5 hours of innovation. There are so many animals every year that get put into shelters just because they are overpopulated. As stated in the introduction, a strong community that is aware of the animal shelters can spark more volunteers and less overpopulation. In Harford County, we seem to be lacking that type of community that is aware of the animal shelter problems we are facing. The different flyers have statistics on them describing how many cats and dogs get put into shelters each year in an attempt to show how the animals are being affected yearly. They also go onto say how many of those shelter animals get euthanized each year not only in the world, but in Maryland too. In addition to the shelter statistics, there are also some behavioral flyers about cats and dogs pointing out different behaviors that would cause owners to want to see a medical professional about treating their animals. The last flyer is one created to play with the pathos of humans, saying that we do not live outside so why should animals, in an attempt to keep animals off the streets and at least some place safe like a shelter. It even goes to encourage people to adopt animals from the shelters. This innovation involves the community which encourages and educates the general population on how to care for any animal they see giving them a reason to care and a reason to help.

The last place that I shadowed at was the Emergency Animal Hospital where I watched many animals come into the hospital without a real reason to be there. The doctor I shadowed there told me that many animals came into the hospital without a true medical issue because many owners do not know what is truly counted as an emergency. That is when I came up with the idea of another flowchart that could be used to inform pet owners of real emergencies when it comes to their pet. This flowchart would count for 5 hours of innovation. The flowchart starts with the greatest type of emergency before slowly decreasing until the issue is not counted as an emergency. The first draft was very crowded and somewhat confusing so the final draft which was color coded and more stream-lined seemed to get rid of that confusion. The relation here from what I learned is that the emergency hospital should only be used for emergencies when people aren’t meaning that informing the public of pet owners of the real types of pet emergencies can keep the emergency hospital for emergencies.

Based on all of the places that I shadowed and volunteered at, I did some research on other national pet days that people should be aware of. The last thing I put time into would be print media flyers created through canva and adobe spark. The print media would count for 5 hours of innovation. These print media’s are different than before, they include the dates of different pet health awareness days, and different shelter adoption months. If there are certain days and months in the year that can remind pet owners to get vaccines or to get dental cleanings or such then it would be very beneficial to let the community know. While they do make calendars that can inform pet owners about these days, having them in flyer versions make them easier to pick up and see at the vet or the shelter or animal hospital all just to help out your pet.

By | 2017-05-17T13:30:43+00:00 May 17th, 2017|Biomed Capstone Project 2017|0 Comments

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