Natalie Salib – Independent Project

Natalie Salib – Independent Project

Class of 2017

Introduction to Topic

Approximately 500,000 babies are born premature each year. Did you know that’s over ten percent of the babies born each year? Approximately only eighty percent of those babies survive each year. (Dimes M. o., 2011). Every 1 in 750 babies is born at the gestational age of 22 to 25 weeks (Dimes M. o., 2011). The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, also known as the NICU is a highly developed care unit in the hospital that specialize in the care of premature and unstable babies. The NICU offers a fast paced, exhilarating field of medicine that instills a lot of curiosity in me. Furthermore, neonatal care is the beginning of the future health of many individuals which is always growing and can always be improved. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit offers a diverse environment to design a pioneering innovation.

Project Description

My project encompasses all aspects of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit; including the challenges and struggles that must continuously be altered and solved to improve the efficiency and health of the premature babies. By completing 80 hours of shadowing, the head Neonatologist, Dr. Fernando Mena, at Franklin Square Hospital; I received a unique and first hand perspective of neonatal care learning all the conflicts that occur daily in the NICU that could be improved. Through all the careers and individuals working in unison at the NICU, I was enabled to understand all aspects of the care of a baby. I realized that overall all one career was the most important and had the biggest impact on the baby itself. A mother. Mothers had such a heavy influence on the baby’s development and health because it was their home for the excepted nine months but they were removed early from it, so the truly rely on them mom in the earliest stages. Although the mothers want to be there for their children they can’t always be. Using this knowledge, my unique innovation incorporates the mothers in a virtual style to help nourish and care for the underdeveloped babies at all times.

Experience Description

Within my shadowing experience, I came to an innovation idea. From my learning and discovering at the NICU at Franklin Square I discovered that the major career and lifeline for the premature babies, was there parents; especially the baby’s mother. The baby relied on the mother until this point on in their life so being removed from this lifeline early made the preemies weaker and made their development a lot slower. With this in mind, I wanted to create a way that would connect the mother and baby at all times. Another observation I made from my time at the NICU, was that with all the private room and cares the NICU provided the parents; especially the mothers were barely there. Maybe it was their other kids, their schedules, or their other obstacles but they needed to be there for their babies. Following this observation, I began to research a way that the mothers helped the babies become stronger and healthier and what sped up the development of the babies.  Babies truly relied on the sound of their mothers’ voices and their mothers’ heartbeats. Many studies showed that premature babies are deprived of their mother’s voices and heartbeats (Eck, 2015). A study at Harvard Medical School, suggests that when premature babies are exposed to recordings of their mother’s voice and heartbeat, the functioning of their auditory cortex, the part of the brain which helps us hear, is significantly improved (Eck, 2015).

Taking this research I wanted to design a way the mothers and babies could be connected. I decided that a speaker device should have a simple software app that would play a recording of the mom’s heartbeat and the mom’s voice singing a lullaby or alphabet. But when I came to this idea a problem arose. How would I get the mother’s voice and heartbeat, if majority of them do not have the time to come in and see their children. Since all the mothers have to be discharged from the hospital, I thought it would be a good time to ask them if they wouldn’t mind letting us record them and informing them of all the positive facts and advantages that their voice and heartbeat would bring to their baby’s health. At this time I would insert the recordings on to the software I like to call, Mommy Messenger. Mommy Messenger was a software device that was simple enough for the NICU nurses to operate but also helpful enough to the babies. The drive would attach on the side of the baby’s crib, so that the sound would be the loudest and most beneficial.

To make my innovation demonstrable I began with a simple crib from the NICU department of the hospital. I then put a baby doll to replicate the baby. I then wanted to replicate the device itself. For this I purchased a phone grab clip that I removed the clip to have an enclosure that would attach to the crib. To attach this case enclosure device I added command strips and the attached the enclosure to the crih. I wanted to make the touchscreen of the device replicated and the system that the nurses would use so I downloaded the Microsoft Powerpoint app, and used my Iphone 7 to play the app I made on the Powerpoint app. I constructed the backgrounds and shapes and screens using Google’s Adobe Spark to make vibrant slides that were simple and easy to understand. I then used the button device on Powerpoint to make buttons that could help transfer the nurses to the patient information page and for them to navigate to the home page and to all the options of the app. Continuing I also wanted to replicate a mother’s voice, so I asked Mrs. Rouplett. She recorded her voice singing ABC’s and Twinkle Twinkle Little Star for me to play them on the app. I also added a computerised heartbeat sound to replicate the sound of the mother’s heartbeat. From this one I finalized my app and place my phone in the enclosure to represent my Mommy Messenger. My innovation incorporates the needs  of the babies, the innovative technology of today’s softwares, and a way to connect the mothers to the babies.

Innovation Description

The innovations that I created are a python turtle code for regulating pipetting into a 96-well plate and a 3D-printed funnel for a 96-well plate strip.  Although there are also 384-well plates, Hector and I only used the 96-well plate, so I focused my innovations around that.  I decided to make my innovations solely on pipetting into well plates because that was the main problem that I experience while I was shadowing.  The problems that we encountered with the well plate include losing where we were in the plate and accidentally either pipetting into the same well twice, or missing a well entirely and not being able to fit the pipette easily into the well plate without some of the liquid spilling.  

My first innovation was a possible solution to the problem of getting lost in the well plate.  This innovation is a python turtle code.  Python is a computer programming language that allows for the programmer to express concepts in fewer lines of code than more advanced computer programming languages, such as C++ and Java.  The code that I made uses a module called “Turtle”, which allows for the user to create an interactive image through Python.  The code creates an image of a 96-well plate with all of the wells being red and provides instructions on how to use it.  Once the user is done pipetting into a well plate, they would simply click on the well that they just pipetted into and press the spacebar to turn that well green in the image.  This allows for the researcher to easily, but effectively stay on track when pipetting and to never lose their spot in the well plate.  My code can be found here.  This code took well over 10 hours to create because I had to learn python coding before I could make the code.  I started learning python coding in the second quarter of AP Computer Science and we are still learning new features of coding now in the fourth quarter.  The actual creation of this particular code took approximately 15 hours.  The original design of the code took be 6 hours to make, but it did not allow for user interaction.  By the time it took to research how to add interaction into the code and to implement it into my design, another 6 hours had passed by.  Once I had another version of my code completed, I asked Mrs. Capozzoli for feedback on my design.  She said that the circles in my design looked more like ellipses.  Since my home computer renders the Python image in 1080p, while the school computer only render the image in 720p, I needed to change my code to be universal for all computers.  This took the remaining 3 hours.  Since this is a computer code, it has no close competitors or legalities.  

My second innovation was a possible solution to the problem of not being able to fit the pipette easily into the well plate.  This innovation is a 3D-printable well plate funnel strip.  My original design of this 3D model was created in Sketch-Up.  This design only took me one hour to complete and it can be found here.  But, I wanted to showcase the 3D-printer, the Ultimaker 2+, that the Biomedical Sciences program has.  So, I took my design from Sketch-Up, and recreated it in an Autodesk application called Fusion 360.  The Fusion 360 file can be found here.  To recreate my design, I used multiple functions found in Fusion 360.  These functions include sketch, revolve, box, extrude, shell, and combine.  Through these functions, I was able to create 12 – 5 mm long funnels connected to 1 – 1mm strip.  Once my design was finished, I exported the file into another Autodesk application called Print Studio.  The main use I had for this application was to check to see if my design had any geometric errors and if my design needed supports when it was printed.  My designed had no errors nor did it need supports.  Finally, I exported my 3D-model into an application called Cura.  This application is the last computer-based step in the 3D-printing process.  It allowed me to position my design where I wanted it to print in the Ultimaker 2+ and add an adhesion plate so that it would print without failure.  From Cura, I then saved the .gcode file onto the Ultimaker 2+ hard-drive and began the print.  The .gcode file can be found here.  This would be printed using PLA plastic.  Since this design will not be manufactured, it has no competitors and it has no legalities.  If this design were to be used in a laboratory, it would need to be discarded after every use to eliminate the possibility of cross-contamination.  The creation of the design in Fusion 360 took me 6 hours.  The preparation of the design in Print Studio and Cura took me 1 hour, and the actual 3D-print took 30 minutes.   

Project Topic

Introduction to Topic

Approximately 500,000 babies are born premature each year. Did you know that’s over ten percent of the babies born each year? Approximately only eighty percent of those babies survive each year. (Dimes M. o., 2011). Every 1 in 750 babies is born at the gestational age of 22 to 25 weeks (Dimes M. o., 2011). The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, also known as the NICU is a highly developed care unit in the hospital that specialize in the care of premature and unstable babies. The NICU offers a fast paced, exhilarating field of medicine that instills a lot of curiosity in me. Furthermore, neonatal care is the beginning of the future health of many individuals which is always growing and can always be improved. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit offers a diverse environment to design a pioneering innovation.

Project Overview

Project Description

My project encompasses all aspects of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit; including the challenges and struggles that must continuously be altered and solved to improve the efficiency and health of the premature babies. By completing 80 hours of shadowing, the head Neonatologist, Dr. Fernando Mena, at Franklin Square Hospital; I received a unique and first hand perspective of neonatal care learning all the conflicts that occur daily in the NICU that could be improved. Through all the careers and individuals working in unison at the NICU, I was enabled to understand all aspects of the care of a baby. I realized that overall all one career was the most important and had the biggest impact on the baby itself. A mother. Mothers had such a heavy influence on the baby’s development and health because it was their home for the excepted nine months but they were removed early from it, so the truly rely on them mom in the earliest stages. Although the mothers want to be there for their children they can’t always be. Using this knowledge, my unique innovation incorporates the mothers in a virtual style to help nourish and care for the underdeveloped babies at all times.

Experience

Experience Description

Within my shadowing experience, I came to an innovation idea. From my learning and discovering at the NICU at Franklin Square I discovered that the major career and lifeline for the premature babies, was there parents; especially the baby’s mother. The baby relied on the mother until this point on in their life so being removed from this lifeline early made the preemies weaker and made their development a lot slower. With this in mind, I wanted to create a way that would connect the mother and baby at all times. Another observation I made from my time at the NICU, was that with all the private room and cares the NICU provided the parents; especially the mothers were barely there. Maybe it was their other kids, their schedules, or their other obstacles but they needed to be there for their babies. Following this observation, I began to research a way that the mothers helped the babies become stronger and healthier and what sped up the development of the babies.  Babies truly relied on the sound of their mothers’ voices and their mothers’ heartbeats. Many studies showed that premature babies are deprived of their mother’s voices and heartbeats (Eck, 2015). A study at Harvard Medical School, suggests that when premature babies are exposed to recordings of their mother’s voice and heartbeat, the functioning of their auditory cortex, the part of the brain which helps us hear, is significantly improved (Eck, 2015).

Taking this research I wanted to design a way the mothers and babies could be connected. I decided that a speaker device should have a simple software app that would play a recording of the mom’s heartbeat and the mom’s voice singing a lullaby or alphabet. But when I came to this idea a problem arose. How would I get the mother’s voice and heartbeat, if majority of them do not have the time to come in and see their children. Since all the mothers have to be discharged from the hospital, I thought it would be a good time to ask them if they wouldn’t mind letting us record them and informing them of all the positive facts and advantages that their voice and heartbeat would bring to their baby’s health. At this time I would insert the recordings on to the software I like to call, Mommy Messenger. Mommy Messenger was a software device that was simple enough for the NICU nurses to operate but also helpful enough to the babies. The drive would attach on the side of the baby’s crib, so that the sound would be the loudest and most beneficial.

To make my innovation demonstrable I began with a simple crib from the NICU department of the hospital. I then put a baby doll to replicate the baby. I then wanted to replicate the device itself. For this I purchased a phone grab clip that I removed the clip to have an enclosure that would attach to the crib. To attach this case enclosure device I added command strips and the attached the enclosure to the crih. I wanted to make the touchscreen of the device replicated and the system that the nurses would use so I downloaded the Microsoft Powerpoint app, and used my Iphone 7 to play the app I made on the Powerpoint app. I constructed the backgrounds and shapes and screens using Google’s Adobe Spark to make vibrant slides that were simple and easy to understand. I then used the button device on Powerpoint to make buttons that could help transfer the nurses to the patient information page and for them to navigate to the home page and to all the options of the app. Continuing I also wanted to replicate a mother’s voice, so I asked Mrs. Rouplett. She recorded her voice singing ABC’s and Twinkle Twinkle Little Star for me to play them on the app. I also added a computerised heartbeat sound to replicate the sound of the mother’s heartbeat. From this one I finalized my app and place my phone in the enclosure to represent my Mommy Messenger. My innovation incorporates the needs  of the babies, the innovative technology of today’s softwares, and a way to connect the mothers to the babies.

Innovation

Innovation Description

The innovations that I created are a python turtle code for regulating pipetting into a 96-well plate and a 3D-printed funnel for a 96-well plate strip.  Although there are also 384-well plates, Hector and I only used the 96-well plate, so I focused my innovations around that.  I decided to make my innovations solely on pipetting into well plates because that was the main problem that I experience while I was shadowing.  The problems that we encountered with the well plate include losing where we were in the plate and accidentally either pipetting into the same well twice, or missing a well entirely and not being able to fit the pipette easily into the well plate without some of the liquid spilling.  

My first innovation was a possible solution to the problem of getting lost in the well plate.  This innovation is a python turtle code.  Python is a computer programming language that allows for the programmer to express concepts in fewer lines of code than more advanced computer programming languages, such as C++ and Java.  The code that I made uses a module called “Turtle”, which allows for the user to create an interactive image through Python.  The code creates an image of a 96-well plate with all of the wells being red and provides instructions on how to use it.  Once the user is done pipetting into a well plate, they would simply click on the well that they just pipetted into and press the spacebar to turn that well green in the image.  This allows for the researcher to easily, but effectively stay on track when pipetting and to never lose their spot in the well plate.  My code can be found here.  This code took well over 10 hours to create because I had to learn python coding before I could make the code.  I started learning python coding in the second quarter of AP Computer Science and we are still learning new features of coding now in the fourth quarter.  The actual creation of this particular code took approximately 15 hours.  The original design of the code took be 6 hours to make, but it did not allow for user interaction.  By the time it took to research how to add interaction into the code and to implement it into my design, another 6 hours had passed by.  Once I had another version of my code completed, I asked Mrs. Capozzoli for feedback on my design.  She said that the circles in my design looked more like ellipses.  Since my home computer renders the Python image in 1080p, while the school computer only render the image in 720p, I needed to change my code to be universal for all computers.  This took the remaining 3 hours.  Since this is a computer code, it has no close competitors or legalities.  

My second innovation was a possible solution to the problem of not being able to fit the pipette easily into the well plate.  This innovation is a 3D-printable well plate funnel strip.  My original design of this 3D model was created in Sketch-Up.  This design only took me one hour to complete and it can be found here.  But, I wanted to showcase the 3D-printer, the Ultimaker 2+, that the Biomedical Sciences program has.  So, I took my design from Sketch-Up, and recreated it in an Autodesk application called Fusion 360.  The Fusion 360 file can be found here.  To recreate my design, I used multiple functions found in Fusion 360.  These functions include sketch, revolve, box, extrude, shell, and combine.  Through these functions, I was able to create 12 – 5 mm long funnels connected to 1 – 1mm strip.  Once my design was finished, I exported the file into another Autodesk application called Print Studio.  The main use I had for this application was to check to see if my design had any geometric errors and if my design needed supports when it was printed.  My designed had no errors nor did it need supports.  Finally, I exported my 3D-model into an application called Cura.  This application is the last computer-based step in the 3D-printing process.  It allowed me to position my design where I wanted it to print in the Ultimaker 2+ and add an adhesion plate so that it would print without failure.  From Cura, I then saved the .gcode file onto the Ultimaker 2+ hard-drive and began the print.  The .gcode file can be found here.  This would be printed using PLA plastic.  Since this design will not be manufactured, it has no competitors and it has no legalities.  If this design were to be used in a laboratory, it would need to be discarded after every use to eliminate the possibility of cross-contamination.  The creation of the design in Fusion 360 took me 6 hours.  The preparation of the design in Print Studio and Cura took me 1 hour, and the actual 3D-print took 30 minutes.   

By | 2017-05-15T15:56:51+00:00 May 15th, 2017|Biomed Capstone Project 2017|0 Comments

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