Shane Velez – Independent Project

Shane Velez – Independent Project

Class of 2017

Introduction to Topic

My project focused on the creation of a video for Aberdeen Proving Grounds. The purpose of my project was to help inform possible investors about the potential use for the VOCkit; a chemical detection system that the army was developing. I spent my time interning at Aberdeen Proving Grounds researching the uses for, and learning about the VOCkit itself. I chose to use this experience as my topic for my innovation since it focused on more of the engineering aspect of the work force. I have come to learn that I am less interested in medicine and more interested in engineering. This topic allowed for the two too join smoothly so I could complete a final product I found worthwhile. This experience allowed me to think of new ways to use the technology I was introduced too.

Project Description

My project included 80 hours of shadowing at Aberdeen Proving Grounds along with 10 hours of working on my innovation. I spent my time at Aberdeen Proving Grounds working on a video with three other interns. Working with others to create a video was just as challenging as making the video itself. The video I was assigned to make was about the VOCkit. The VOCkit is a handheld chemical detector meant to eliminate chemical threats in war zones. I learned a lot about chemical warfare and defense through the research of the VOCkit. This research led me to my own innovation. A handheld diagnostic kit. This diagnostic kit makes use of the colorimetric sensor arrays to detect pathogens in your blood. To make this into a functioning final product I needed to learn how to 3D print a model using Solidworks and had to do research on how these arrays work when reacting with blood. In the end, I created a product that works well for the handheld diagnostic of bacterial infections.

Experience Description

My shadowing was completed at Aberdeen Proving Grounds over the summer and involver working with three other interns to create a group of videos that would describe the purpose of various projects on the base. Each one of us were assigned our own primary video and were told to research heavily on that topic as we were ultimately responsible for delivering the final video that was assigned to us. We were supposed to help each other out and make sure that no one fell behind. I worked closely with an intern named Tim, while the other two interns worked more closely with themselves. During my first week, I was just supposed to do research on my topic, the VOCkit, while getting acquainted with the base itself. Each of the interns I worked with had their own mentors and we were all introduced during this first week. This also meant that we did a lot of touring the base, seeing where everyone worked and what everyone did. The most interesting spot on the base, in my opinion, was the building that housed the 3D printers. They had 3D printers that were massive compared to the ones we have at the school and they told us about some of the projects that the printers are being used for. One of these projects was the VOCkit. This meant that I was allowed to come back to the 3D printing lab to get video later on in my internship since it related to the VOCkit. The casing of the VOCkit was printed using these 3D printers. Another tour that we got to see was the design room for a drone that carried light loads into combat zones for various reasons. The one we were told about was a drone that carried a small strip of chemical detection tape into a warzone. It would then sample the area using this tape and return the data back to the user. The hope was to add a VOCkit to the back of these drones to increase their potential for chemical detection. After we had completed our tours it was time to actually make our individual videos and this was very easy for me since I had done adequate research and had access to filming areas that were closely related to the system I was working with. By the end of the summer I completed my own video plus two additional videos on other miscellaneous topics. We were supposed to present our videos to a panel of other mentors and student interns at the end of the summer but due to a tech failure we had to improv in a room full of Ph.D.’s and mentors. I was able to improv my presentation very well since I knew what I was talking about. I do attribute some of this success to biomed presentations over the past few years. I ended up receiving multiple compliments on how I was able to persevere through the tech failure and still present a respectable product at the end of the summer. This was the highlight of the internship for me. I really enjoyed working with Tim over the summer but had trouble working with the other two interns, Nia and Sen. They were nice people but we were very different and did not get along that well. My mentor, Dr. Peter Emanuel, was awesome. He was very intimidating and stern at first but ultimately helped a lot in creating a final product that I was proud of. You could also tell he cared about this internship being a success not just for his own project but for us as well. There were many times over the summer where I did not have much to do during a day and sat around trying to occupy myself, but for the most part, we were able to stay occupied. Overall, my experience at Aberdeen Proving Grounds was very worthwhile.

Innovation Description

The final innovation I chose to create is a handheld diagnostic kit that uses colorimetric sensor arrays to detect bacteria in blood. I came up with this idea during my internship where I worked closely with colorimetric sensor arrays due to my involvement with VOCkit. When I first started doing research on these arrays I knew there was a lot of room for innovation as the arrays themselves are fairly new. I spent many hours at Aberdeen Proving Grounds sifting through a packet of information that my mentor had given me about these arrays. This packet included how they worked, how accurate they were, and the uses they hoped to put them to on base. I then tried to think about how I could use these to make a medical innovation and did research on their ability to detect bacteria in blood. This is where I found a study that showed they were able to detect the difference between 18 different bacteria with an accuracy of 91.9%(Sung, 2014). This is when I came up with the idea to make a handheld diagnostic kit. This kit will work by having five different arrays set up next to each other in a handheld device. The user will then prick their finger and drop a droplet of blood onto the array labeled use. Three of the arrays will be filled with the end result of common, expected bacterial infections. For example, one might be the result of a droplet of blood infected with strep throat. At the far end of the device will be a slot for normal. The user will then compare their own array to the arrays of the other expected bacterial infections. If they find a match then they should consider going to get anti biotics. However, if they match with the control, then they can assume they do not have any of the bacterial infections that the test was testing for. To create this product, I used solidworks. I was slightly familiar with this software before using it but had to reteach myself a lot of the mechanics behind making my design. Creating the final product in solidworks and then 3D printing it took me upwards of five hours. I can say for sure that I have done far more than five hours of research on this topic and have well exceeded the ten-hour minimum that is required for this innovation. This innovation will address three main problems. The first being the expense of going to the doctors. These arrays are cheap and the case is made of plastic. There is no reason for the kit to be expensive. The second is that it will be a huge time saver. Going to the doctors can take a long time, usually upwards of an hour for myself. These arrays will begin changing immediately and the reactions are usually complete within five minutes (Miklos, 2016). The last is eliminating the fear that some people have of the doctors. If someone is scared to go to the doctors then this is an easy alternative.  The closest competition is a product in development called rHEALTH. It is a product that hopes to be able to detect diseases using a single drop of blood and using the DNA in the blood to test for ailments (Alba, 2014). However, this technology is far off and will run a much higher cost. My final innovation hopes to be able to detect bacterial infection with 91.9% accuracy and reduce the need for trips to the doctors.

Project Topic

Introduction to Topic

My project focused on the creation of a video for Aberdeen Proving Grounds. The purpose of my project was to help inform possible investors about the potential use for the VOCkit; a chemical detection system that the army was developing. I spent my time interning at Aberdeen Proving Grounds researching the uses for, and learning about the VOCkit itself. I chose to use this experience as my topic for my innovation since it focused on more of the engineering aspect of the work force. I have come to learn that I am less interested in medicine and more interested in engineering. This topic allowed for the two too join smoothly so I could complete a final product I found worthwhile. This experience allowed me to think of new ways to use the technology I was introduced too.

Project Overview

Project Description

My project included 80 hours of shadowing at Aberdeen Proving Grounds along with 10 hours of working on my innovation. I spent my time at Aberdeen Proving Grounds working on a video with three other interns. Working with others to create a video was just as challenging as making the video itself. The video I was assigned to make was about the VOCkit. The VOCkit is a handheld chemical detector meant to eliminate chemical threats in war zones. I learned a lot about chemical warfare and defense through the research of the VOCkit. This research led me to my own innovation. A handheld diagnostic kit. This diagnostic kit makes use of the colorimetric sensor arrays to detect pathogens in your blood. To make this into a functioning final product I needed to learn how to 3D print a model using Solidworks and had to do research on how these arrays work when reacting with blood. In the end, I created a product that works well for the handheld diagnostic of bacterial infections.

Experience

Experience Description

My shadowing was completed at Aberdeen Proving Grounds over the summer and involver working with three other interns to create a group of videos that would describe the purpose of various projects on the base. Each one of us were assigned our own primary video and were told to research heavily on that topic as we were ultimately responsible for delivering the final video that was assigned to us. We were supposed to help each other out and make sure that no one fell behind. I worked closely with an intern named Tim, while the other two interns worked more closely with themselves. During my first week, I was just supposed to do research on my topic, the VOCkit, while getting acquainted with the base itself. Each of the interns I worked with had their own mentors and we were all introduced during this first week. This also meant that we did a lot of touring the base, seeing where everyone worked and what everyone did. The most interesting spot on the base, in my opinion, was the building that housed the 3D printers. They had 3D printers that were massive compared to the ones we have at the school and they told us about some of the projects that the printers are being used for. One of these projects was the VOCkit. This meant that I was allowed to come back to the 3D printing lab to get video later on in my internship since it related to the VOCkit. The casing of the VOCkit was printed using these 3D printers. Another tour that we got to see was the design room for a drone that carried light loads into combat zones for various reasons. The one we were told about was a drone that carried a small strip of chemical detection tape into a warzone. It would then sample the area using this tape and return the data back to the user. The hope was to add a VOCkit to the back of these drones to increase their potential for chemical detection. After we had completed our tours it was time to actually make our individual videos and this was very easy for me since I had done adequate research and had access to filming areas that were closely related to the system I was working with. By the end of the summer I completed my own video plus two additional videos on other miscellaneous topics. We were supposed to present our videos to a panel of other mentors and student interns at the end of the summer but due to a tech failure we had to improv in a room full of Ph.D.’s and mentors. I was able to improv my presentation very well since I knew what I was talking about. I do attribute some of this success to biomed presentations over the past few years. I ended up receiving multiple compliments on how I was able to persevere through the tech failure and still present a respectable product at the end of the summer. This was the highlight of the internship for me. I really enjoyed working with Tim over the summer but had trouble working with the other two interns, Nia and Sen. They were nice people but we were very different and did not get along that well. My mentor, Dr. Peter Emanuel, was awesome. He was very intimidating and stern at first but ultimately helped a lot in creating a final product that I was proud of. You could also tell he cared about this internship being a success not just for his own project but for us as well. There were many times over the summer where I did not have much to do during a day and sat around trying to occupy myself, but for the most part, we were able to stay occupied. Overall, my experience at Aberdeen Proving Grounds was very worthwhile.

Innovation

Innovation Description

The final innovation I chose to create is a handheld diagnostic kit that uses colorimetric sensor arrays to detect bacteria in blood. I came up with this idea during my internship where I worked closely with colorimetric sensor arrays due to my involvement with VOCkit. When I first started doing research on these arrays I knew there was a lot of room for innovation as the arrays themselves are fairly new. I spent many hours at Aberdeen Proving Grounds sifting through a packet of information that my mentor had given me about these arrays. This packet included how they worked, how accurate they were, and the uses they hoped to put them to on base. I then tried to think about how I could use these to make a medical innovation and did research on their ability to detect bacteria in blood. This is where I found a study that showed they were able to detect the difference between 18 different bacteria with an accuracy of 91.9%(Sung, 2014). This is when I came up with the idea to make a handheld diagnostic kit. This kit will work by having five different arrays set up next to each other in a handheld device. The user will then prick their finger and drop a droplet of blood onto the array labeled use. Three of the arrays will be filled with the end result of common, expected bacterial infections. For example, one might be the result of a droplet of blood infected with strep throat. At the far end of the device will be a slot for normal. The user will then compare their own array to the arrays of the other expected bacterial infections. If they find a match then they should consider going to get anti biotics. However, if they match with the control, then they can assume they do not have any of the bacterial infections that the test was testing for. To create this product, I used solidworks. I was slightly familiar with this software before using it but had to reteach myself a lot of the mechanics behind making my design. Creating the final product in solidworks and then 3D printing it took me upwards of five hours. I can say for sure that I have done far more than five hours of research on this topic and have well exceeded the ten-hour minimum that is required for this innovation. This innovation will address three main problems. The first being the expense of going to the doctors. These arrays are cheap and the case is made of plastic. There is no reason for the kit to be expensive. The second is that it will be a huge time saver. Going to the doctors can take a long time, usually upwards of an hour for myself. These arrays will begin changing immediately and the reactions are usually complete within five minutes (Miklos, 2016). The last is eliminating the fear that some people have of the doctors. If someone is scared to go to the doctors then this is an easy alternative.  The closest competition is a product in development called rHEALTH. It is a product that hopes to be able to detect diseases using a single drop of blood and using the DNA in the blood to test for ailments (Alba, 2014). However, this technology is far off and will run a much higher cost. My final innovation hopes to be able to detect bacterial infection with 91.9% accuracy and reduce the need for trips to the doctors.

By | 2017-05-15T15:59:13+00:00 May 15th, 2017|Biomed Capstone Project 2017|0 Comments

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